• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Secure Was The Tsarist System in 1900’s.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Secure Was The Tsarist System in 1900's For hundreds of years, the Tsars, both male and female, had ruled Russia. By modern day standards we would view a tsar as a dictatorial monarch. One person in complete control of a country two and a half times the size of the USA. The tsar had 3 official bodies through which he exercised his authority; The Imperial Council, The Cabinet of Ministers and The Senate. These titles all sound very powerful; in fact in political circles today we have departments who hold the same or similar titles. However, in tsarist Russia, these roles were far less significant. They were there simply to advise the tsar and deal with the administrative requirements of ruling a country. By no means did they affect the power and the authority of the tsar, whose word was finite, and woe betide anyone who dared dispute this. Due to the considerable advances of the West both economically and politically, Russia was viewed as being very backwards. In this essay I will be looking at both the strengths and the weaknesses of the tsarist system, in an attempt to draw some conclusions about the security and the stability of this age-old system. As the tsar had complete control over the country, he was therefore able to censor the education that middle class students received in universities. ...read more.

Middle

This therefore meant that if you happened to be born into the royal family and became tsar, you were only one step down from God himself. Because of this it was easy for the tsar to keep the peasants downtrodden. If God had wanted people to lead better lives, he would have had them born into different social classes. There is however a slight implication to this, an in 1861, Alexander 11 brought about the emancipation of the serfs, allowing them to be released from bondage to live as peasants. This "jump" from serf to peasant came at a high price. The government raised the tax on property sales to increase the revenue that was needed to compensate the landowners for the loss of their serfs. Money was available to the peasants from the government, but this left them with mortgages so large they and their families would be paying it for generations. The tsar also abused the control he had over the church and the peasants with the introduction of Russification. This was an attempt by Alexander 111 to unite the whole of Russia. This was an endeavour to minimise the effect of the minority nationalities that were living in Russia. It was decided that Russian would be the official language with all business and political circles using Russian only. ...read more.

Conclusion

However due to the advancement of the rest of the world, Russia could not stay lurking in the middle ages for much longer. It could be said that the Intelligentsia were simply doing what all other Europeans governments were doing for their country, trying to push it forward as much as possible. Industry did not appear to be of any major concern for any of the tsars. For years they had the opportunity to really make something out of the areas of farmland that were productive, even though this was a relatively small area in comparison to the size of Russia and its population. However the tsar enforced such high taxes onto the peasants that the only real chance they had of owning any land was to live in Mir's, a commune system where all land was shared, thus giving no incentive to make the land work to the best of its abilities. I feel that if the rest of the world had not made such great advancements in industry and human rights, Russia would have maintained its safe cocoon of autocratic rule. However world advancement cannot be blamed for the blunders of the tsars and their advisors. For too long they survived through fear and intimidation, dependant on their reputation and authority, despite the fact they did nothing worthwhile to earn this respect. It is therefore not surprising that eventually the tsarist system fell. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 essays

  1. 'THE TSARIST REGIME WAS SECURE BY 1905'

    Hence he entitled his most important policy statement: 'Save Russia by rapid and forceful industrialisation'. The tsar had no choice but to accept his plans and Witte began ruthlessly by collecting as much capital as he can. He then began building an efficient railway system that was essential if Russia wanted to increase its extraction of resources.

  2. Investigate the changes that took place in Horsforth between 1700 and 1900

    If Horsforth was a industrialised town after the Industrial Revolution(which we are trying to prove) we will probably find that some streets would have been name after post-Industrial Revolution ideas. 6. Graveyards The graveyards give us a good idea into the population of the village and the markings on tombstones

  1. 'To What Extent Did Tsar Alexander III's Reign Mark A Major Change From That ...

    On the role call for a regiment he was agitated to hear far too many German names, when the call came to 'Woronoz' he exclaimed 'Thank God for Woronoz!' In demonstrating his Anti-Semitism, Alexander III once commented upon an official document: '...we must not forget that it was the Jews who crucified our Lord and spilled his precious blood.'

  2. The blance sheet for russia.

    In order that the strength of the working class should cease to be a mere potential and become a reality, it must be organised and concentrated in a single point. This can only be done through a political party with a courageous and far-sighted leadership and a correct programme.

  1. How secure was the Tsar's powers up to 1904?

    The aim of this was to show workers the benefits of a non revolutionary approach to social problems. Similar organisations were set up in other trade in different areas, but when in 1903 Zubatov unions led strikes in south Russia the employers put pressure on the government to have them disbanded.

  2. How Successful Was Roosevelt’s New Deal?

    Franklin D. Roosevelt believed the Supreme Court judges had made these decisions simply because they did not like the laws and not because the laws went against the Constitution. The President tried to get Congress to agree to allow him to appoint up to six new judges of his choice.

  1. Both Russian Revolutions stemmed from Russians' dissatisfaction with the Tsarist government's ineptitude

    Power out of a gun barrel indeed. Both Russian Revolutions stemmed from Russians' dissatisfaction with the Tsarist government's ineptitude. Before the onset of the 1905 revolution there was brewing resentment in all three faction of the Russian population: the peasants, the workers, and the intelligentsia.

  2. What happened to the Romanov Family? Sourcework

    In addition to this, the two sources are not entirely independent, as they are both based on the findings of Judge Sergeyev. Question 2. (b) How far does the account in Source C differ from those in Sources B and A?

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work