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How Stable was Russia by the Start of WW1?

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Introduction

How Stable was Russia by the Start of WW1? How Stable was 'The Tsar/ Aristocracy' by the Start of WW1 When Nicholas was 26 years old and still politically immature, Alexander III died suddenly of kidney disease on October 26, 1894. His father had kept him out of most affairs of state, but the ill-prepared Nicholas nevertheless became the czar. Acutely aware of his limitations, he was initially overwhelmed by the responsibility of ruling Russia. However, his fatalistic attitude and his resolution to fulfill his duty helped him survive this initial crisis. His marriage to Alex of Hessen-Darmstadt, a German princess who changed her name to Alexandra after converting to the Russian Orthodox faith, also helped stabilize Nicholas in his new role as Tsar. In 1895, he publicly rejected the idea that "zemstvos," or public assemblies, should participate in the process of social change. He called these democratic aspirations "senseless dreams," a condemnation that shocked and angered many of his subjects. Furthermore, Nicholas seemed insensitive to the increasing hardships faced by the Russian people at this time. Unrest was high as the largely agricultural country struggled to industrialize and urbanize. ...read more.

Middle

Those who favored a continuance of Russia's autocratic government believed that he looked foolish for ever having agreed to the creation of the Duma, while those who advocated the establishment of a constitutional monarchy resented Nicholas' treachery in creating the Duma and then ensuring that it remained ineffective. The 1905 revolution left Nicholas with no stability, leading up to the start of the World War many opposition groups were forming especially because of the new political assembly they were able to be in the foreground rather than just as underground opposition. The monarchy's prestige suffered further as the entire royal family was subjected to harsh criticism. Alexandra had never been popular with the Russian people. Her cold and austere manner had alienated even many aristocrats. Nicholas and Alexandra's four daughters and one son were held in higher regard, but they had little if any interaction with Russian society. The Tsarevich Alexis was also a hemophiliac, a condition that Nicholas and Alexandra carefully hid from all but their closest companions. Between 1905 and 1917, the royal family came into further disrepute by their association with an alleged holy man and mystic known as Rasputin. ...read more.

Conclusion

On February 22, 1917, street demonstrations broke out in the capital, Petrograd. By the 25th, there was large-scale violence, and by February 27th, most of the local garrisons had mutinied. Nicholas finally recognized the severity of the situation, and in a desperate attempt to save the monarchy, he abdicated power to his brother, the Grand Duke Mikhail Aleksandrovich. The Grand Duke declined to serve, recognizing that the people of Petrograd were no longer willing to accept a Tsar at all and that the monarchy had come to an end. Nicholas II was emperor of Russia from 1894 to 1917. A symbol of the tremendous wealth of the Russian aristocracy and the source of the monarchy's autocratic rule in the country, Nicholas was plagued throughout much of his reign by social and political unrest. His determination to maintain the undiminished power of the throne convinced many Russians that much needed reforms could only come through revolution. With the Russian people in turmoil, he led the country into World War I his position had never been as unstable as it proved with the success of the war being make or brake for the Tsarist regime. which proved to be the case and to have his dynasty violently overthrown by the Russian Revolution. ...read more.

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