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How successful was the Nazi' Economic Policy between 1933 and 1939

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How successful was the Nazi' Economic Policy between 1933 and 1939 In order to examine the success of the Nazi' Economic policy I must first consider the ideas it contained. In 1932, 5.6 million people were unemployed. Hitler aimed to massively decrease unemployment in Germany and this was one of the most attractive aims, from the voters' point of view, on the economic policy. High employment would mean a boost in the economy. He also aimed to remove Jews from the economy, thus creating jobs for Aryans as well as excluding the 'aliens'. After World War 1, the Treaty of Versailles demanded that Germany pay reparations of 6600 million to the victorious nations. This was an enormous figure and because the treaty also removed Germany's most productive industrial areas from her, such as the Ruhr, she struggled to pay them. This was one element that caused Germany's economy to collapse; because she was unable to gain sufficiently from industry. Hitler therefore aimed to end the reparation payments, thus giving Germany a greater chance of recovering a successful economy because she would have more funds available to develop industry. The level of industrial production in Germany was very low compared to the glorious days of the Kaiser. Hitler planned to increase it in order to give Germany a chance in boosting her economy. If Germany could boost her levels of industry; she would gain more money and, therefore, have more money available to further develop industry, thus creating an exponential rise in production. ...read more.


The remaining unemployed citizens were sent to the SA, SS, other Nazi organisations, Gestapo, Army, Navy or shipbuilding. This helped to reduce unemployment to just one million by 1936, and to negligible levels by 1938. Aryanisation of the economy was also achieved in 1938, when all Jews were removed from the economy and this helped additionally to increase Aryan employment. Hitler was very successful in reducing unemployment. The whole of Germany being employed meant that the economy could grow because people had money to spend on luxury items. This in turn meant that industrial production could be boosted and the economy improved. Hitler also created his own added advantages to high levels of employment because of the fields in which he created jobs. He managed to build roads which would be useful for transporting armies, and also increase the size of Nazi organisations, secret services, and the army. Many of the unemployed people would have been the working class and by giving them jobs in the Nazi party they would have been forced to work for Hitler and, therefore, give him support; thus making the Nazis even more powerful. 'I was unemployed for many years. I'd have made a pact with the devil to get work. Hitler came along and got me work so I followed him.' A German worker. Employment greatly reduced the risk of an attempted revolution because people were happy when they had jobs and money. ...read more.


Between 1939 and 1945 Germany was totally dependant on Sweden for imports of iron ore to manufacture war materials and such like. Therefore, Hitler was not very successful in making Germany an Autarkic country because Germany was not 100% self sufficient and relied on other countries to continue successful industrial production, There was no overall increase in agricultural production during Hitler's time in power. Although wheat and vegetable oil manufacture increased, this was at the expense of the prosperity of meat production. Even with the increased amounts of home produced vegetable oil, its high demand as a lubricant for factory machinery meant that more had to be imported in order to keep industry running. Germany also imported much of her food. Therefore, Hitler did not succeed in making Germany self-sufficient because she relied on other countries in order to keep running efficiently. Without imports, her industry would have collapsed and the economic policy would have lacked success. In conclusion, most of the Nazi aims in the Economic Policy were successful. Hitler managed to raise employment levels to almost 100%; more than double industrial production, exclude Jews; rearm and develop an army powerful enough to fight a war with much success for six years; and, therefore, greatly boost Germany's economy and the public's spirits. He did not, however, create and Autarkic country. This was a long-term aim and if he had been successful in World War 2 he would have achieved this. Ruth Naughton-Doe 11A 19:42 05/11/25 ...read more.

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