• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10

How Typical of Medieval Churches is St. Marys Church?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Typical of Medieval Churches is St. Mary's Church? St. Mary's church, once known as St. Andrews has been disputed as being an atypical church for the medieval period. This is what I shall be investigating using primary and secondary sources. St. Mary's has suffered many disasters both natural and man-made. These range from earthquakes to fires. When the new church was built in 1305 it gained vast amounts of money from rich merchants in the wool trade. They patronised the church leaving large sums of money, with this they used the money how they saw necessary to expand the church, its popularity, and make people look at it and feel intimidated. St. Mary's Church was one that had significant importance to the people of Hitchin, and pilgrims from across the country. It was open for all classes; however there was a rood screen to divide rich and poor. When parishioners visit the church they can see how wealthy it is and feel overcome thinking back to there own homes, and work places. During the15th century three private chapels were built that doubled the size of the church, they were built using the money from three rich families who were all church people of St. ...read more.

Middle

In St. Mary's church there are three private chapels, these are the chapel of holy trinity, the chapel of St. John the Baptist and the St. Andrews Chapel. Together these three private chapels built in the 15th century almost doubled the size of the church. St. Andrews chapel built by the donation from the Pulter family is a great example to portray the churches wealth, along with the spectacular roof with its ornate carvings and angles above watching down on you it has a fantastic screen to enter it, called the angel screen. This is one of the most respected and well known screens for its decorations. The ceiling shows how influential church followers can be, the roof in this chapel has gold stars and gold angles looking down on you as shown in the pictures to the right. This chapel was named after the previous name of the church before it became St. Marys. Simon Jenkins mentions in his book that St. Oswald Church also boasts extravagant private chapels. "Malpas's two treasures are the Cholmandeley and Brenton Chapels, each divided from the nave by perpendicular screens with tracery of lace like delicacy"7 Other parish churches also have private chapels that are impressive and boast there quality's, "The Chapel is more ornate. ...read more.

Conclusion

Mary's. I believe that all the features I have talked about and investigated are typical of all parish churches in the way that they all have them. But the way and extravagance that St. Mary's features are decorated leads me to a final conclusion that St. Mary's church is atypical of other parish churches in the medieval period. St Mary's church was on the good end of a great wool trade in Hitchin, the money that was received from the rich merchants and patriots of the church led to every typical church feature being bigger, better, and a lot more ornately decorated. This extra detail in all areas of the church also did the job of enticing new church followers and patriots to possibly fund new projects in and around the church if the new followers were rich. During the medieval times all churches were well kept and had many followers, but St. Mary's had that extra benefit of rich followers that left a great deal of money for them to do and use as they pleased. So that's why I believe St. Mary's church is an atypical one, simply because of its extravagance and extremely ornate decorations. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Was Cromwell a Hero or a Villain?

    1943 By this the children were so frightened; the children went to bed immediately. It shows how many people hated Cromwell and how bad a ruler he was. Children were very much terrified by the use of his name. Information from other websites http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk says "...theatres were closed by Cromwell,

  2. Castles, the key to power in Medieval England

    These made a good outer defence but as at Cardiff a plain, outer defence would just not be enough. So they would need a motte inside the walls for protection to make a stronghold to be protected by a few foot soldiers.

  1. Is Quarry Bank Mill a typical example of manufacture and production in a British ...

    They used goose feather quills, of which on our visit we were allowed to try them. From the evidence given by Superintendents of the Apprentice House, it appears that girls are educated in reading and writing less than boys. Girls were taught to sew, enabling them to make clothes and shirts for the boys.

  2. Life of Oliver Cromwell

    Called the Rump Parliament. Cromwell on his return tried to make the Rump set up new election dates. Therefore uniting the three countries within the common wealth, and one main church. Instead the Rump held other elections, that did not solve the power struggle nor the religious problem.

  1. Was Oliver Cromwell a villain?

    It was also done in retaliation as 3000 English Protestant had been murdered by Irish Catholics in Ulster. These actions also prevented further bloodshed of English settlers by setting an example to the Irish that attacks on the English would not be tolerated.

  2. Was Oystermouth Castle typical of the castles built in Wales during the middle Ages?

    These castles were built mainly in the South coast of England. This was when Henry 8th was afraid of invasion and attacks from Europe. Deal Castle (built in 1539) is an example of this type of castle. It had very thick walls, this was because of cannons that walls were thick; this also meant the inside was small and dark.

  1. Roosevelt's New Deal

    Source I supports the statement in a way that in the song there is a part that speaks of how "He's got things in full sway, we're all working and getting our pay..." in this line we can notice how Roosevelt through his New Deal he got people back to

  2. Was Oliver Cromwell a hero or a villain?

    The Victorian liked him as they were proud to be ruled by an elected member of parliament, everyone could worship freely, admired the soldiers who had built up their empire, Middle class Victorians disapproved of drinking and gambling and Cromwell helped ban these things.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work