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How useful are sources A, B and C to an historian studying the attitudes of British soldiers to their commanding officers during the First World War? Use sources A, B and C and your own knowledge.

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Introduction

How useful are sources A, B and C to an historian studying the attitudes of British soldiers to their commanding officers during the First World War? Use sources A, B and C and your own knowledge. The First World War started in 1914 after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and ended in 1918. Britain's opposition was mainly Germany. There were many devastating effects due to the war such as tremendous amount of death and destruction. The defending positions were trenches on both sides. To attack, both sides relied on their artillery to destroy opposing trenches and positions. Often a rolling barrage would be used but with trenches protected with barbed wire obstacles and well positioned machinery there was invariably a heavy loss of lives, after the war Generals were heavily criticized for making these attacks. In this essay I will be looking at sources A, B and C to judge which one would be most useful to an historian studying the attitudes of British soldiers to their commanding officers during the First World War. ...read more.

Middle

Most of the time they spelt in mud as a result of this the soldiers became critically ill. Overall I think this source is useful as it has a good understanding of soldier's lives, because conditions were very poor and many British servicemen died knowing that they made no advance, which made soldiers worry at the futility of it all. This source is not that reliable as we don't know who drew it or when, it is also unlikely to have be drawn by a soldier but very similar to humour in Soldier magazines. Source B is a comedy programme called "Blackadder" and produced by two men called Ben Elton and Richard Curtis. This source shows a sarcastic view of fictional British General's orders; it also shows Generals didn't really care about their soldiers as only few went to the frontline to see the conditions. They also didn't care about how many lives being taken by the enemy as a result many British servicemen died. ...read more.

Conclusion

But General Haig was awarded a sum of money from the parliament for his services to the country. This source is not very reliable as it is written by his own son. The limitation of this source is the fact it's his son writing about his father, you expect any son to defend their father from critics. Its does give a good example of old soldiers, if old soldiers thought he was a murderer and a "uncaring" General why didn't they say so after the war its only 20 years on when people are questioning his greatness. Overall I think it's a useful in a way that it gives some good points but it is from Haig's own son. Over all I think that Source B is most useful to an historian studying the attitudes of British soldiers to their commanding officers during the First World War. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amy Dack Haig Coursework (Part 1) 4041 1 ...read more.

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