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How useful are sources B and C in helping you to understand the effects of the Blitz on people in Britain? (10)

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Introduction

2. How useful are sources B and C in helping you to understand the effects of the Blitz on people in Britain? (10) Sources B and C are partly useful in helping us to understand the effects of the Blitz on people in Britain. Source B is a photograph of an air raid in London dated 21st January 1943. The source is useful because it illustrates the aftermath of a bombing raid. The photograph shows civilians and air raid wardens sacking bodies in bags. There are people putting bodies in sacks, women in uniform suggesting that they could be nurses, a policeman, air raid wardens and a man in a suit implying that he could be a teacher or a headmaster. This also suggests that civilians also came to help. The source is useful because it is a clear photograph showing the organisation of the officials and the Government in clearing up after air raids. ...read more.

Middle

The source also does not suggest if there were any other targets e.g. factories or docks and it also does not imply if the air raid was an accident or not. The photograph is of limited use in showing the full effects of the Blitz on all the people in Britain. The source does not even show the full effects on the people in London. Source C is a photograph of people looking happy and showing thumbs up. It is a photograph showing the positive aspects of the Blitz. It is dated 15th September 1940 with the caption, 'British grit' which shows it was a propaganda source. The source illustrates soldiers and civilians in the aftermath of a bombing raid. The source also hints at the damage to buildings and furniture; 'their houses are wrecked' but this is not clearly shown. ...read more.

Conclusion

We can see this because of the number of people and possessions in the photograph. The source is only one photograph of one incident in a part of London in the first week of the Blitz. The photograph was and probably cut down to cut out the damaged buildings to keep morale high. Like source B, the source cannot illustrate the effects of the Blitz on all British people and it is very limited in showing the full effects of the air raid throughout London and Britain. In conclusion, sources B and C are partly useful in helping us to understand the effects of the Blitz on people in Britain. Source B would come in more useful since it shows the horrific effect of the air raid and is an example of censorship, whereas Source C shows how they posed a photograph illustrating the effects of the Blitz for propaganda purposes. ...read more.

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