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How useful are the sources A, B and C in understanding what the battle for Dunkirk was like? Explain your answer.

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Introduction

History Coursework, 1 Dunkirk May/June 1940 Question 1, How useful are the sources A, B and C in understanding what the battle for Dunkirk was like? Explain your answer. Sources A, B and C give a slight understanding what Dunkirk was like: Source A is a first hand account of what happened at the beach's, this was written most probably at the early stages of the evacuation, the Commander Thomas Kerr was one of the officers sent to organise the evacuation. When he talks about 'the odds and ends of an army' he is talking about, the solders that were there, were untrained, scared and undisciplined, they had no faith at all. ...read more.

Middle

Source C is a change in morale form what we read in the earlier sources, it is another first hand account, he describes the bravery of one RASC Sergeant, it describes how after most of his men were killed, he drove off the German planes with a Bren machine gun, this source shows that by this stage they did have weapons and ammunition left, this source seems at an impression to be a little over exaggerated, who this was by also proves that they bring in ships form all over England that could sail to Dunkirk. These sources are useful in some ways, they prove the fact that The Battle Of Dunkirk was a very brutal, unorganised, undisciplined, evacuation, all of these sources were made my navy or able seamen, who ...read more.

Conclusion

From my own research I have got a lot of information, the boats that were used during the evacuation ranged from larger ships like, Destroyers and cargo boats, To small little boats like fishing boats, yachts, pleasure steamers and holiday boats. From Britain's point of view Dunkirk was a great success, but it had its bad side, during the campaign 5,000 men died, but the amount that were saved were as followed: By May 30/31 some 80,000 troops had been rescued, and eventfully by the end of the evacuation, 212,000 British officers and men were rescued, 113,000 allied troops mainly French, and 13,000 wounded! By the end, many of the French solders were left behind and captured, and made POW's. By Edward Semprini Form 4 History course work ...read more.

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