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In many of the rooms the floors are not flat or have been damaged in some way. From the evidence available to you at the site and through other sources can you hypothesise about how the floors were damaged?

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Introduction

Question 3 coursework. In many of the rooms the floors are not flat or have been damaged in some way. From the evidence available to you at the site and through other sources can you hypothesise about how the floors were damaged? At the site of Fishbourne Roman Palace, there are over 100 beautifully crafted mosaics. These are a very elaborate type of flooring made from 1000s of multicoloured ceramic squares. Only very wealthy people with lots of status could afford to have them in their homes, let alone over 100 as there are on the Fishbourne site. Over hundreds of years, the mosaics have been subject to wear and tear from general use through to ploughing in medieval times. In this extended answer I will look at and explore the reasons of the damage to the beautiful mosaics. I will divide the types of damage up into three sections: � Natural � Man - Made � Structural Firstly some of the natural damage was caused by tree roots coming through the ground then up through the mosaics. Weed roots although do little damage on their own would also have caused some damage is there was lots of them. ...read more.

Middle

The hypocaust looked like lots of different piles of tiles stacked on top of each other around the floor. Although it looked a bit dodgy, it proved to be effective in Roman settlements although never used at the Fishbourne site. This damaged the mosaics as the hypocaust were usually built on top of them so crushing them and causing bits to fall apart. Another way that the roman's themselves damaged the prestigious flooring is that on some of the mosaics in some of the rooms, there are lots and lots of scorch marks. These scorch marks would most likely have come from hot braziers and ovens that would have been sitting on top of the mosaics. Braziers and hot ovens were mainly used on industrial sites, which further backs up the possibility of the site becoming an industrial site after its original use as a palace for King Togidubnus. These scorch marks would cause thick embedded black lines to form across the mosaics. This would be extremely hard to restore as part of the mosaics is worn away from the shear heat of the braziers. Objects could also have been accidentally but frequently dropped on the mosaics if it was used as an industrial site and this might have chipped parts of the mosaics. ...read more.

Conclusion

I see no need for this as it is destroying our history as a nation. I think that the thing which probably caused the most damage to the mosaics was when the digger was digging a main water trench. This digger just sliced through them like cutting through cheese. I say that this was the most damaging factor but at least the mosaics could be pretty much restored whereas the scorch damage from the braziers could not be restored as it is engraved into the ceramic. So in a way the damage from things like the sinking caused by the rubbish dump and the granary posts is worse damage as it cannot be restored easily. If the present day Fishbourne site had a better roof that did not leak that would help to keep the mosaics in tip top condition. Overall I think that the most damaging type of damage was the man-made damage. I think this because there are far more factors that damaged the mosaics in this category than in natural and structural and the damage caused under this category destroyed the mosaics more. This is because man-made damage can have a lot more strength and force behind it than natural does although tree roots can be very strong and can even push up through concrete. ...read more.

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