• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10

In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution in the Soviet Russia?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution n the Soviet Russia? Content Plan of investigation............................................................2 Summery of evidence.............................................................2 Evaluation of sources ..........................................................4 Analysis..........................................................................5 Conclusion.......................................................................6 Appendix 1.......................................................................7 Appendix 2.......................................................................8 Bibliography.....................................................................9 In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution in the Soviet Union? A. Plan of Investigation The change in economic policy and the turn to the five year plans in 1928, which is often referred to as 'the great turn', is seen by many as a turning point for Stalin's Russia. According to some historians, this symbolizes the moment when Russia started its descent from the socialist revolutionary way. With regards to the peasantry and industry, the five year plan had great effects- often conflicting. This investigation aims to examine in what sense the policies of collectivization and industrialization constituted a second revolution in the Soviet Union. It will cover the reasons for starting the five year plan, its aims, the situation of the peasantry, the development of industry and of the proletariat and the changing role of the party. Through the analysis I will assess the extent of change, mainly with regards to the people, that took place in Stalin's Russia. Only if the extent of change was very great can we talk about another revolution. The sources in use include contemporary textbooks, first hand accounts and other documents. B. Summary of Evidence 1. The start of the five year plans 1928 By 1927, after pursuing the NEP for a number of years it was clear to many in the communist party that it would not be able to push Russian industry much further beyond the pre-war level. ...read more.

Middle

Talking about the fatherland as means of achieving unity. We can deduce from this that Stalin was very intelligent, highly capable and had knowledge of how to manipulate things to be beneficial to him. For example, not mentioning the Germany defeat and using the defeats as a reason for industrialization. We also have a number of limitations to take into account- this was written as a speech by Stalin. Its aim is to convince, manipulate and capture. Stalin knew that. He has to produce an answer that will be both effective to crush his opponents and persuasive. Due to this we should treat the source very carefully or we might fall into this trap ourselves. Moreover, according to the speech we still cannot be certain if rapid industrialization was the answer for Soviet Russia. 23 D. Analysis The face of Russia after the five year plans was not the same. During this time a number of processes took place affecting Russian society and causing change. How major was it and how did it affect the Russian people? A key process following the five year plan was urbanization. The consequences of it could be felt in other areas of life. Major flow of peasants to the city not only led to the expansion of the proletariat and the worsening of living standards, but also, in part, to the introduction of the passport system, designed to monitor and prevent the movement of peasants24. In practice this meant that peasants were bound to the collective- they were farming land which was not owned by them but by the state, most of their produce taken away, often leaving them hungry. ...read more.

Conclusion

She was beaten because to do so was profitable and could be done with impunity. Do you remember the words of the pre-revolutionary poet: "you are poor and abundant, mighty and impotent, Mother Russia" these words of the old poet were well learned by these gentlemen. They beat her saying: "you are abundant," so one can enrich oneself at your expense. They beat her saying: "you are poor and impotent", so one can be beaten and plundered with impunity. Such is the law of the exploiters- to beat the backward and the weak. It is the jungle law of capitalism. You are backward, you are weak- therefore you area wrong; hence, you can be beaten and enslaved. You are mighty- therefore you are right; hence, we must be wary of you. That is why we must no longer lag behind. In the past we had no fatherland, nor could we have one. But now that we have over thrown capitalism and power is in the hands if the working class, we have a fatherland, and we will defend its independence. Do you want our socialist fatherland to be beaten and lose its independence? If you do not want this you must put an end to backwardness in the shortest time possible time and develop genuine Bolshevik tempo in building up its socialist system of economy. There is no other way. That is why Lenin said during the October Revolution: "either perish, or over take and outstrip advanced capitalist countries". We are fifty or a hundred years behind the advanced countries. We must make good this distance in ten years. Either we do it, or they crush us. Stalin, J. Problems of Leninism, Moscow, 1945, p. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 essays

  1. How did the rule of Stalin affect the Soviet Union?

    Marx an atheist called religion the 'opium of the people' because he felt that priests taught people to except the miseries of life and to look forward to the after-life. In the civil war religious groups faced persecution, priests were killed and religious buildings were destroyed.

  2. 'The Five Year Plans brought glory to Stalin and misery to his people.' How ...

    Many leading figures like Kamenev, Bukharin and Zinoviev were put on trial because they were traitors of the nation and additionally other non leading figures were put on trial like 500,00 party members on charges of anti Soviet activities and were either executed or sent to labour camps.

  1. The Policies of Joseph Stalin 1928 1953

    Stalin thought Trotsky was making plans to overthrow his and so he had Stalin murdered. This paranoia lead to the Great Purges of 1938. There is some truth in this statement because Kirov was murdered. Kirov's murder was controversial but it is possible he was murdered because he was a threat to Stalin's position.

  2. China 1945-90 - source based questions.

    It was a period of national celebrations across China, with an official three day public holiday to mark the event. The speculation and forecasts of the collapse of Hong Kong's booming stock market and vibrant economy under a socialist government have come to nothing.

  1. How did living conditions change in towns as a result of the Industrial Revolution ...

    During the 1700 to around 1750 , canals were the main focus on transportation . This had resulted in many of them being constructed between production and trading areas .This particular method and the usage of canals seemed appropriate for some time but were not ideal when large masses of material needed to be transported .

  2. Stalin and the Five Year Plans

    This was fourteen times the amount of coal a miner was expected to mine by himself in one shift. Of course this story was a set up, but it worked incredibly well as propaganda. Many workers looked up to Stakhanov and worked harder than they ever had to try and earn the prestigious award of being named a Stakhanovite.

  1. How Successful Were Stalin's Policies During His Leadership of the Soviet Union?

    The building of the Russian state and its defence against aggressors became important themes during the war and the Russian war effort benefited from Stalin's ability to invoke patriotism in response to the German invasion.

  2. 'The Five Year Plans brought glory to Stalin and misery to his people' - ...

    However, Stalin justified his actions by conveying that Russia is fifty to hundred years behind the capitalist and advanced Western countries and she must catch up with them as soon as possible - hopefully in ten years in order to avoid being crushed by them.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work