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In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution in the Soviet Russia?

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Introduction

In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution n the Soviet Russia? Content Plan of investigation............................................................2 Summery of evidence.............................................................2 Evaluation of sources ..........................................................4 Analysis..........................................................................5 Conclusion.......................................................................6 Appendix 1.......................................................................7 Appendix 2.......................................................................8 Bibliography.....................................................................9 In what sense did the policies of collectivization and industrialization constitute a second revolution in the Soviet Union? A. Plan of Investigation The change in economic policy and the turn to the five year plans in 1928, which is often referred to as 'the great turn', is seen by many as a turning point for Stalin's Russia. According to some historians, this symbolizes the moment when Russia started its descent from the socialist revolutionary way. With regards to the peasantry and industry, the five year plan had great effects- often conflicting. This investigation aims to examine in what sense the policies of collectivization and industrialization constituted a second revolution in the Soviet Union. It will cover the reasons for starting the five year plan, its aims, the situation of the peasantry, the development of industry and of the proletariat and the changing role of the party. Through the analysis I will assess the extent of change, mainly with regards to the people, that took place in Stalin's Russia. Only if the extent of change was very great can we talk about another revolution. The sources in use include contemporary textbooks, first hand accounts and other documents. B. Summary of Evidence 1. The start of the five year plans 1928 By 1927, after pursuing the NEP for a number of years it was clear to many in the communist party that it would not be able to push Russian industry much further beyond the pre-war level. ...read more.

Middle

Talking about the fatherland as means of achieving unity. We can deduce from this that Stalin was very intelligent, highly capable and had knowledge of how to manipulate things to be beneficial to him. For example, not mentioning the Germany defeat and using the defeats as a reason for industrialization. We also have a number of limitations to take into account- this was written as a speech by Stalin. Its aim is to convince, manipulate and capture. Stalin knew that. He has to produce an answer that will be both effective to crush his opponents and persuasive. Due to this we should treat the source very carefully or we might fall into this trap ourselves. Moreover, according to the speech we still cannot be certain if rapid industrialization was the answer for Soviet Russia. 23 D. Analysis The face of Russia after the five year plans was not the same. During this time a number of processes took place affecting Russian society and causing change. How major was it and how did it affect the Russian people? A key process following the five year plan was urbanization. The consequences of it could be felt in other areas of life. Major flow of peasants to the city not only led to the expansion of the proletariat and the worsening of living standards, but also, in part, to the introduction of the passport system, designed to monitor and prevent the movement of peasants24. In practice this meant that peasants were bound to the collective- they were farming land which was not owned by them but by the state, most of their produce taken away, often leaving them hungry. ...read more.

Conclusion

She was beaten because to do so was profitable and could be done with impunity. Do you remember the words of the pre-revolutionary poet: "you are poor and abundant, mighty and impotent, Mother Russia" these words of the old poet were well learned by these gentlemen. They beat her saying: "you are abundant," so one can enrich oneself at your expense. They beat her saying: "you are poor and impotent", so one can be beaten and plundered with impunity. Such is the law of the exploiters- to beat the backward and the weak. It is the jungle law of capitalism. You are backward, you are weak- therefore you area wrong; hence, you can be beaten and enslaved. You are mighty- therefore you are right; hence, we must be wary of you. That is why we must no longer lag behind. In the past we had no fatherland, nor could we have one. But now that we have over thrown capitalism and power is in the hands if the working class, we have a fatherland, and we will defend its independence. Do you want our socialist fatherland to be beaten and lose its independence? If you do not want this you must put an end to backwardness in the shortest time possible time and develop genuine Bolshevik tempo in building up its socialist system of economy. There is no other way. That is why Lenin said during the October Revolution: "either perish, or over take and outstrip advanced capitalist countries". We are fifty or a hundred years behind the advanced countries. We must make good this distance in ten years. Either we do it, or they crush us. Stalin, J. Problems of Leninism, Moscow, 1945, p. ...read more.

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