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In What Ways Did the British Government Attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the People of Britain?

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Introduction

In What Ways Did the British Government Attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the People of Britain? The British government attempted to hide the effects of the Blitz in many ways. They did this because they realised that one of Hitler's plans was to break the British public's morale. Therefore the Ministry of Information controlled what was published in newsreels, photographs, the press, radio, etc. They were given the responsibility of deciding to what extent the British public knew the truth a bout what exactly was going on around the country. One of Hitler's plans was to make Britain to surrender to him, and one way to do this was to try and break the morale of the British people by bombing them, destroying their homes and killing their family. ...read more.

Middle

Another example of a way the ministry of information tried to boost moral of the British public, was by publishing a letter by Humphrey Jennings. The letter gave encouraged the British public to carry on by congratulating them on their effort so far in the war. Letters published like this one aimed to boost morale, in turn influencing people to play their part valuable part in the war effort. The Ministry of Information also aimed to hide the effects of German bombs. They did this by using censorship, for example a photograph showing a girls school being bombed in Catord, London would not have been allowed to be published, as it showed bodied in sacks. ...read more.

Conclusion

second that the British public believed that the RAF was causing the Germans a lot of damage, and were putting up a good fight. Hence if they were to find out that many aircrafts had gone down, they would get demoralized, and may start to believe that the British were going to lose the war. In conclusion, the ministry of information ensured that only information that was beneficial to increasing the morale of the public was released. It was very important that they kept the general morale up, as it gave the British public that extra bit of encouragement to carry on playing their part in the war effort. In turn this led a lot of help being received by the British forces. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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