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In what ways did the British Government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain?

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Introduction

In what ways did the British government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain? Hitler was creating a huge amount of destruction on Britain mainly because he wanted to lower the morale of the British people, but the British government tried to prevent that from happening and also the spread of panic, by particularly hiding the negative effects of the Blitz and they needed to act quick since there were a massive 2000 casualties in September alone when it first started. The government also wanted to maintain the war effort to make sure the civilians would keep volunteering to fight and be willing to go on because Churchill believed he could defeat the Germans even though Britain was in a really bad position, and he wanted to prove to Hitler that Britain was not going to be easily defeated. Censorship took an extremely important role during the war which affected newspapers and the broadcasting industry. ...read more.

Middle

However the BBC was not government controlled; it censored itself and played a very important role of keeping the morale high and informing the public of what was going on. They had a lot of power because many people trusted the broadcasting company as an estimated 25 million people tuned in by the end of the war. One example of a very successful method of boosting morale was listening to the comedian Tommy Trinder who made jokes about hardships and mocked Hitler and the Nazis and this was something the people took comfort in. Using propaganda was one of the main ways the government used to make sure the morale of the British people was kept high. The Ministry of Information was a government department responsible for publicity and propaganda during the war and by putting out positive and reassuring messages across such as "Keep calm and carry on," helped everyday life go on as normal as possible and reduce the panic and bad talk across the country. ...read more.

Conclusion

To make sure the morale was kept high, Mass Observation Reports took place by the government to see what the general mood of the public was like and their thoughts on the war and the governments reaction to it. By observing this, the government would be able to improve or change their techniques of propaganda so they know how to maintain a good sense of morale. Although the government was blocking the real hard truth of the Blitz, it was incredibly necessary because they were desperate for high morale so that Britain as a whole, would survive the problems they were facing. This was known as the "Blitz Spirit" which was encouraged through propaganda,censorship and Churchill. All the time the government tried to keep positive by exaggerating, especially when it came to valiant stories on the newspapers. Fortunately, Britain had Winston Churchill as their prime minister who was eager to handle this war so his confidence reassured and told the British people that, "If we are together, nothing is impossible." ?? ?? ?? ?? 14/02/2010 ...read more.

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