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In what ways did the treaty of Versailles threaten the survival of the Weimer republic?

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Introduction

´╗┐History essay: In what ways did the treaty of Versailles threaten the survival of the Weimer republic? The treaty of Versailles was established to significantly weaken the economy of Germany. It was established in June 1919 by Woodrow Wilson (president of USA), George Clemenceau (prime mister of France) and David Lloyd George (prime minster of Great Britain) they were called the ?big three? and were allies in world war one. The five terms they discussed was territorial agreements, war guilt, reparations, disarmament and maintaining peace. Their ideas were for territorial agreement to take about thirteen percent of land away from Germany and they would distribute the German colonies as mandates under control of countries supervised by the league this would make sure those different colonies were not going together to start another war. ...read more.

Middle

The effects of the treaty of Versailles posing a threat on the survival of the government was very likely because the treaty was very harsh and left Germany in such a bad state politically, socially and economically it meant that they felt they had gotten stabbed in the back by their government which meant in the short term they are going to be very hurt and want a new maybe very extreme party to get Germany back on its feet a change from the previous government, so the idea of proportional representation came into play and so parties that were extreme like the Nazi?s could manage to get into the Reichstag if they got the votes. Because of the German hatred for its government the ideas that some politically parties that usually wouldn?t be considered were and because the Germans wanted to blame someone for the ...read more.

Conclusion

Article 48 is a reason for this, even though the decision was to be made by the Reichstag in case of an emergency the president could rule over all this was good in the short term because if there was a crisis an overall leader could rule, however in the long term when Hitler came into power he used this all the time without there being an emergency. Also the bill of rights helped with the government it was the setting up of the welfare state for the poor. Overall I do feel that the treaty of Versailles was the main reason for the survival of the weimer republic to be threatened. It took away all the essentials Germany needed to survive as a country caused the German people to feel the need for a different style leader and leading to the rising of Hitler and world war two. ...read more.

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