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In what ways were the demands of the Irish Civil Rights Movement similar to those of the American Blacks Civil Rights Movement?

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Introduction

Question 1 In what ways were the demands of the Irish Civil Rights Movement similar to those of the American Blacks Civil Rights Movement? There were similarities in the demands of the Irish Civil Rights Movement in Northern Ireland and those of the American Blacks Civil Rights Movement in the United States. However, there were also differences in some of their demands. Most of the original grievances in both countries stemmed from corrupt governments. These demands wanted these grievances to be sorted out. Both movements used the slogan 'one man, one vote'. But these meant slightly different things. ...read more.

Middle

The B' Specials were largely responsible for such acts. This was a part time police force consisting entirely of Protestants. As a result, Catholics suffered. In the USA, police officers regularly discriminated against blacks. The American Blacks Civil Rights Movement demanded an end to this as in Northern Ireland. A difference was that in Northern Ireland, they called for the disbandment of the B' Specials. However, in America, they just called for an impartial police force. They didn't demand the disbandment of any part of it. In both countries, Catholics and blacks were heavily discriminated against in employment. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Irish Civil Rights Movement in Northern Ireland didn't call for such laws to be abolished because they didn't exist. Although Catholics often lived separated in ghettos, it was not law for them to do so. Catholics demanded that the Special Powers Act (Orange Law) was abolished. This was an act despised by Catholics as it was often used against them. It could be used to intern suspects without trial and to search a house without a warrant. Also, both groups wanted protection - Catholics from loyalist paramilitaries, and blacks from the Ku Klux Klan. In conclusion, although both civil rights movements were happening in different parts of the globe, they were very similar. They demanded similar things in their struggle to gain equality. ...read more.

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