• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In what ways were the lives of Africans changed by the policy of Apartheid in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Joanne Vale In what ways were the lives of Africans changed by the policy of Apartheid in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's? Between 1948 and 1954, D. Malan had established apartheid policies leading to a white run government and the segregation of blacks from whites. This changed the lives of black South Africans during the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's and in this assignment, I will be looking at how apartheid played a major role in new laws and white people's views towards the blacks, how this helped them to control the lives of black Africans, and that blacks could not influence the government, leading to them having no control over the way the country and their lives were run. The question itself already tells us that the blacks had no say over the ever changing political and economic laws, and that whites were dominating their way of life. By the 1950's, both the Population Registration Act and the Immorality Amendment Act were in existence, and it were a time in which the blacks had started to believe that their lives were going to begin improving, or so they thought. ...read more.

Middle

Non-whites were not allowed into cities or towns, and this caused misery, suffering and humiliation for those forced to move. Although this law was not successful, it still maintained the effect of white dominance, and the blacks realised that whilst apartheid was playing a big part in laws, they would not be able to rule or live their own lives. Petty apartheid granted that whites could control everyday tasks for the blacks, and gave the different races total segregation from each other. It ensured that blacks and whites had different bus stops and buses, cinema's, parks, hospitals etc, and gave blacks an insight to what the future would bring for them: more heartache and depression caused by apartheid. This made the blacks feel like their futures were going to be continually ruled, and that their children would be brought up in a country where whites made blacks feel inadequate and un-important. This would have been a horrible time for the black population, and they felt angry that even though the whites were the minority, their lives were becoming useless to them, and that their every movement was being controlled. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the South African lives in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's were terrible hard times, when blacks and native people could not see a clear and happy future. Whites were so worried about how supreme and dominative they were, that they didn't stop to think about how much pain and heartache they were causing the black and native folk. I feel that apartheid was a cruel way in which for whites to rule the black people' lives, and that, in the end, they wanted to rule everything about them. The white population were a minority to blacks, so I feel that this shows how scared and worried the blacks were of white folk, and the laws. The whites needn't have worried about the blacks over-powering them as the blacks could have easily gone against the rules, but they didn't through fear of the government, police and the laws. Again, apartheid had crushed the black people's hopes of a better life. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE USA 1941-80 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE USA 1941-80 essays

  1. Why did white minority rule last so long in South Africa?

    enough to explain the longevity of the rule by the NP over a predominantly Black South Africa. The rise of African Nationalism in the 1940's and subsequent successful demonstrations do little to explain why white rule lasted so long into the 20th century.

  2. In What Ways Were The Lives of Africans changed by the Policy of Apartheid ...

    This made their lives worse, especially the coloured families because in most cases each member of a family was placed in a different groups which simply implies they were possibly going to see each other again, and they would have to rebuild their lives with strangers, and they also had

  1. Why did opposition to Apartheid grow during the 1950s and 1960s in South Africa?

    He led the "Defiance Campaign". On bail appealing against a 6 years sentence, he went underground with MK. He was caught and sentenced to life imprisonment. Also there was Nelson Mandela, he became the president of the Youth league of the ANC in 1950.

  2. South Africa and Apartheid: Have the effects of apartheid disappeared?

    Walter Susulu and Nelson Mandela went underground but were later sentenced to life imprisonment. In 1960, the ANC carried out a peaceful protest in Sharpsville. As a result of this, 69 members died and 180 were wounded. However, after this, the ANC proved to be a growing pressure to end Apartheid.

  1. The Disadvantages that Black Americans faced in the early 1950's.

    Segregationist leaders called for student boycotts. They were part successful with two thousand pupils skipping lessons in order to make a stand against black students learning alongside them. The events of the 1950's and the exceptional leadership and inspirational skills of Martin Luther King provided the springboard for further developments in the next decade.

  2. What were the causes of the Black Riots in the 1960s?

    They were then arrested and beaten. Similarly in 1991 the arrest and brutal beating of Rodney King, resulting in a fracture skull and serious internal injuries was a major cause of the later riots. It can be seen that the application of unnecessary force by racist police officers played a key park in starting both of the riots.

  1. Apartheid was created by Dr Malan, and was introduced in 1948 in South Africa. ...

    This pass book just so happened to be 96 pages long. It was a way to keep South Africans under surveillance. However whites only needed to carry a card. This all added to white supremacy. The pass books could be asked for by any policemen walking the streets, whether the

  2. Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA in ...

    The black people found it hard in life; they had high levels of illiteracy and had little or no education. The black people were not given a chance in life. They were classed as second class citizens. This is terribly unfair and needed a stop putting to it.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work