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In what ways were the lives of Africans changed by the policy of Apartheid in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's?

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Joanne Vale In what ways were the lives of Africans changed by the policy of Apartheid in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's? Between 1948 and 1954, D. Malan had established apartheid policies leading to a white run government and the segregation of blacks from whites. This changed the lives of black South Africans during the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's and in this assignment, I will be looking at how apartheid played a major role in new laws and white people's views towards the blacks, how this helped them to control the lives of black Africans, and that blacks could not influence the government, leading to them having no control over the way the country and their lives were run. The question itself already tells us that the blacks had no say over the ever changing political and economic laws, and that whites were dominating their way of life. By the 1950's, both the Population Registration Act and the Immorality Amendment Act were in existence, and it were a time in which the blacks had started to believe that their lives were going to begin improving, or so they thought. ...read more.


Non-whites were not allowed into cities or towns, and this caused misery, suffering and humiliation for those forced to move. Although this law was not successful, it still maintained the effect of white dominance, and the blacks realised that whilst apartheid was playing a big part in laws, they would not be able to rule or live their own lives. Petty apartheid granted that whites could control everyday tasks for the blacks, and gave the different races total segregation from each other. It ensured that blacks and whites had different bus stops and buses, cinema's, parks, hospitals etc, and gave blacks an insight to what the future would bring for them: more heartache and depression caused by apartheid. This made the blacks feel like their futures were going to be continually ruled, and that their children would be brought up in a country where whites made blacks feel inadequate and un-important. This would have been a horrible time for the black population, and they felt angry that even though the whites were the minority, their lives were becoming useless to them, and that their every movement was being controlled. ...read more.


In conclusion, the South African lives in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's were terrible hard times, when blacks and native people could not see a clear and happy future. Whites were so worried about how supreme and dominative they were, that they didn't stop to think about how much pain and heartache they were causing the black and native folk. I feel that apartheid was a cruel way in which for whites to rule the black people' lives, and that, in the end, they wanted to rule everything about them. The white population were a minority to blacks, so I feel that this shows how scared and worried the blacks were of white folk, and the laws. The whites needn't have worried about the blacks over-powering them as the blacks could have easily gone against the rules, but they didn't through fear of the government, police and the laws. Again, apartheid had crushed the black people's hopes of a better life. ...read more.

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