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Ireland-sources

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Introduction

Is there sufficient evidence in sources D to H to explain why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969? The "troubles" refer to the that problems broke out between Catholics and Protestants living in Northern Ireland in 1969. The Protestants and Catholics had resented each other for centuries. They had different cultures, religion and beliefs to each other. The "troubles" went on for nearly three decades, and they only stopped with an enforcement of a peace treaty (Good Friday agreement) in 1998. The "troubles" included lots of violence, bombs and sectarian killings. English influences in Ireland first originated in 1171 when English Baron's seized land in Ireland. William of Orange is an extremely important figure in protestant history. He won the Battle of the Boyne for the Protestants which took place in 1690. The Battle of the Boyne was contested between King William II (William of Orange) against Catholic King James II, his father in law. The rivalry between the two kings was due to political rivalry in Britain and mainland Europe. The victory is celebrated annually on the 12th of July by celebrations organised by the Loyal Orders. Most Catholics don't like these celebrations as to them it's an example of Protestant supremacy, but for Protestants its just a part of their culture. ...read more.

Middle

It contains very little sufficient evidence as not only is it bias it's exaggerated because it's a cartoon. This source doesn't show much information but it does show that there has been resentment over a long period of time between Catholics and Protestants, which eventually led to the troubles in 1969.-THIS IS POORLY WORDERED Source D is an extract from the book 'The Price of My Soul'. It is about a Roman Catholic student (B.Devlin) who attended school in the Catholic region of Dungannon. She describes her school days, she attended a Catholic school called "St Patrick's Academy", you can tell by this it's a patriotic school as "St Patrick" is an Irish saint. She tells us how the vice principal at her school Mother Benigmus, felt about Protestants and the British. She says she didn't hate the Protestants but didn't see them as true Irish people. The same viewpoint was held by the majority of Roman Catholics as the English settlers who came to Ireland, had different religious beliefs to the Irish. Mother Benigmus said that the Protestants are different and are educated differently to the Catholics. The school that B.Devlin was a catholic school so they were separated from Protestants. The children that attended the school suffered from Indoctration as they were taught that they were superior to Protestants. ...read more.

Conclusion

The situation in Northern Ireland would have been quite hostile and there would have been tension between the Catholics and Protestants because it this only happened a few months before the troubles began and incidents like this could have said to triggered the cause. I would say this source is very sufficient because the troubles began only a few months later from when this took place perhaps one of the reasons why the troubles began in the first place was because the Protestants and the RUC weren't very tolerant towards the Catholics and this would have angered them. The sources contain sufficient evidence as why the troubles broke out between Catholics and Protestants. The sources don't go into much detail, they don't tell you background information or the past history between Catholics and Protestants. It doesn't mention Home Rule, IRA or the Sinn Fein. Sinn Fein is an Irish political party which were formed in 1905. They wanted to unite Ireland and they pressed the British Government to grant Ireland Home Rule and they were eventually successful when the law was passed in 1914. They had many Catholic supporters as they supported their beliefs were shared by the Irish Catholics who also wanted to unite Ireland. Sinn Fein campaign on a variety of issues such as women's right, education, discrimination, housing and many more things. Currently it is the second largest party in the Northern Ireland Assembly. By Frihah-10Bronte/DSC ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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