• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Is there sufficient evidence in Sources D to J to explain why the Troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Is there sufficient evidence in Sources D to J to explain why the Troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969? Problems began in Ireland long before 1969's troubles and continue today. The dilemmas are a consequence of an ongoing reason, which is the opinion of some people in Northern Ireland that those of the opposite religion are attempting to overpower and enforce a certain way of life upon the rest of Northern Ireland's civilisation. This problem stems back along way to similar events when King Henry VIII changed the religion of England from Roman Catholic to Protestant, he tried to enforce this in Ireland too but met strong opposition, as most of the Irish remained loyal to the Catholic Church so there was danger of an Irish rebellion. Continuing into the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603) the worry was that Ireland would become allies with England's catholic enemies because many Irish Catholic lords rebelled against English rule and Protestantism. They received harsh treatment and the Elizabethan attempt to conquer Ireland ended in 1601,when, to reward her Protestant supporters, Elizabeth gave them lands taken from the Catholic Irish rebel leaders. ...read more.

Middle

Houses, jobs, and votes being unmistakably unfairly allocated, lead to the setting up of the CRA. Protestants were kept in employment in times of depression in preference to fellow Catholic workers. For instance in 1961, 68/75 bus drivers in the city of Fermanagh were Protestant. The unfair election system called "The Gerrymander" supplied the majority of votes to Protestants. 25'000 adults were therefore disenfranchised for local elections, nearly all of them being Catholics. Source F is an example of the issue of unfair voting within Northern Ireland. The map shows that in one ward the Catholic voters had 10'047 of the 11'185 votes, which is evidently unfair. On the other hand, the other two wards shown on the map have a Protestant domination of votes. Overall, the source shows that there was unfair distribution of votes, which is another significant reason in the build-up to Ireland's troubles of 1969. Still, although this appears to suggest that Protestants were being unnecessarily harsh to Catholics, another factor not portrayed in the sources is the Protestants reasons for fearing a United Ireland. Since they regarded Catholics as their enemies, they did not want to give them higher positions because they felt the Catholics would destroy them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Though not entirely happy, the Unionists, who wanted Ireland to remain closely linked with Britain, accepted Home Rule (Britain's control) in just the six counties of Ulster. However, the Nationalists continued to fight for a United Independent Ireland. Catholics and Protestants live in both the two divided countries. Therefore partition has been ineffective in bringing peace to Ireland. Instead friction continued to cause major issues between the two religions but this is not mentioned in any of the supplied sources and so fails to contribute to a listing of foundations on which Ireland's troubles have developed. This is yet another example of further causes that built up to 1969's trouble. However without these mentioned in Sources D to I, there is not sufficient information to generate a fairly decided conclusion to why troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969. The Sources are well selected and show a diverse collection of important aspects that contributed to the troubles of 1969.They give a reasonable idea of some causes of Irelands problems. On the other hand many events of greater importance are not mentioned. Therefore I do not think there is sufficient evidence in them to fully and fairly explain why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969. LAUREN BAKER 11B4 -History Coursework on Ireland ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Conflict in Ireland

    In 1916 after the formation or the I.R.A by Michael Collins, attacks on the police and soldiers marked the start of the War of Independence. As a result of the of the Violence and bloodshed from the War of Independence the British decided that something had to be done and

  2. Northern Ireland Conflict-Religion vs. PoliticsThe conflict in Northern Ireland is likely one of the ...

    They gathered over a half a million signatures, some of the Unionists even signing in their own blood. The debate over Home Rule was put on hold when World War I broke out. The Dublin Easter Rising of 1916 served as a reminder to the British that the question of

  1. How far do the sources support the view that Irish Nationalism was an 'increasingly ...

    Croke had been a noticeable supporter of the Land League agitation, but it was the Gaelic Athletic Association that allowed him to denounce English culture. The clergy believed that gaelic games distracted the young from the lure of revolutionary activity.

  2. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    The main Catholic community was the Catholic community of the Falls Road, which had been part of the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century. Literally adjacent to the Falls Road, there was an area known as the Shankhill Road, which was the main Protestant working class community.

  1. How Did the Catholics Grow To hate the Protestants?

    Events in the past show that Sinn Fein has always been against the British Government ever since they wrongly blamed Sinn Fein for the Easter Rising where 1,500 rebels took over the Dublin Post Office and other key buildings in the city.

  2. Co-operation and Conflict - Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland.

    After several years passing by, a new political party was set up that had inherited their name by the Gaelic expression for 'Ourselves Alone.' It was first set up in 1905 and its aim was to attain a nationalized self determination.

  1. Why has it been difficult to obtain peace in Northern Ireland?

    They agreed to an intergovernmental conference that would be held regularly, they would keep cross border co-operation on political legal and security matters, the British Government accepted the possibility of a united Ireland in the future, but only if the majority of Northern Ireland consented and the Republic of Ireland accepted the existence of partition and the principle of consent.

  2. Was the Partition of Ireland the most important cause of The Troubles?

    This might of helped cause the troubles because many Loyalists thought that NICRA was a Catholic organization and they would not like the leaders of it and other Catholics going on marches for Civil Rights, because they thought that going on the marches would give them a chance of getting equal Civil Rights.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work