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Is there sufficient evidence in Sources D to J to explain why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969?

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Introduction

G.C.S.E. History Coursework. Owen Jenkins Is there sufficient evidence in Sources D to J to explain why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969? Introduction In this piece of coursework I have to gather information on the sources provided and use background information of my own knowledge to round up a conclusion of ''Did sources D to J explain why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland in 1969 ?''. Source D My first bit of evidence comes from comes from Source D. this source doesn't really tell me a lot on why the troubles broke out in Northern Ireland on Bloody Sunday. Source D is a statement from a Roman Catholic women thinking back to her school days in 1969. This was when the troubles were at its worst. However even though she is remembering back to her school days, the information she is giving us could be exaggerated due to lack of memory or being biased, so it is not a reliable piece of evidence. In says in the passage of her story ''She disliked the English but did not hate the Protestants''. We know this because she went to a patriotic school. B Devlin was a civil rights campaigner and was later an MP. The writers were to sell off her book, to show her political view. This of course has limitations, one of them being that she could have exaggerated her story but this would make her a good sale. Education in Northern Ireland is a major social problem with Catholic and Protestants children going to separate schools. All attempts to make 'mixed' religion schools have failed because churchmen on both sides have insisted on separate schools. But this is not mentioned in the source. Overall this source does not tell us enough information on why the troubles broke out, but it does tell us the tensions between Catholics and Protestants. ...read more.

Middle

This is the historical backdrop for ''The Clearing''. The English Parliament enacts legislation which will confiscate the land of native Irish and banish them to the distant and inhospitable province of Connacht. The confiscated land would then be used by the government to pay off its war debts. This brutal scheme never proved entirely successful in its implementation, and The Clearing shows the horrifying personal consequences of such a brutal and calculated action. And although the Act of Transplantation was eventually suspended, the practice of driving people from their homes and forcibly relocating them onto distant and undesirable lands went on to be used at great length in the American colonies. This source also relates to source E because they both show Catholics using violence and both show Protestants being ''tied up'' and ''defenceless''. Also the source is biased, as it does not mention that Protestants took over the Catholics. I had to find that out myself. Source H Source H is a picture of three RUC officers who are Protestants and are beating up a Catholic. Immediately this source tells us that the troubles are very close to the date of the 5th/10th/1968. However this source has no author so we don't know if it's shown as a Protestant or Catholic view. Again the source is limited. The three RUC officers striked the march because it could have been violent. Evidence of this is that they used weapons to club down the marchers. Again I am able to use my own knowledge, as the source doesn't really tell me a lot. I am looking at source 8 of the booklet which is written by a marcher but is unreliable as it is written in 1974. The photograph in this source is the most reliable one so far because it is a photograph, but its only one image not the whole picture so it could be biased. ...read more.

Conclusion

one round at an identified target but in this programme the Paras clearly do not do this as individually they are shown shooting multiple rounds. However this is no mention what so ever of this yellow card. Also I think it was a bad decision to use the Paras to police a riot because for they are the most aggressive regiment in the British army. It is just asking for trouble. The circumstances under which this source was made are that it was meant to be a drama based on documentary evidence of Bloody Sunday. It was made to be broadcast on a national television network. Due to it being a piece of entertainment then it is possible that it could have certain parts could have been exaggerated. The director might also have added or left bits out and used things to increase the tension. Also the actors who play the characters interpret them how they feel and not how they actually might have acted. The source also gives no information about the producer whether they were Catholic, Protestant, British or Irish. Conclusion All sources above show us images of tension and go some way to explaining the historical issues surrounding tension in Northern Ireland. However there are limitations with most of the sources as they are biased, cannot look at them as an individual basis and needs more information on how to get a more accurate picture. I had to use background information to get my answers for my sources which is in my help booklet. The example I am going to use is the plantation of Ulster. There was not enough information on the source so I used the booklet to give my overall opinion of the source. My overall opinion is that there werent enough evidence just coming out of the sources. Like I said I had to use background information to really get my answers. Many of the sources did not include the date or author. For example source E. ...read more.

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