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"It was the enabling law that allowed Hitler to dominate Germany by the end of 1934" Explain how far you agree with this statement.

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Introduction

"It was the enabling law that allowed Hitler to dominate Germany by the end of 1934" Explain how far you agree with this statement. Hitler passed the Enabling Act on March 24th which gave him the power to pass any laws without the Presidents or the Reichstag's contribution. It gave him the power to basically be a dictator for four years. He was also able to arrest and place anyone he felt a threat into a concentration camp. Germany's plans to be a democracy had basically failed. However at the time Hitler passed the law Germany was still a democracy and after the four years, he could be voted out. If Hitler was to have full power and change the fact he could be voted out, he needed to become president. Presidents at the time could not be voted out. If he became president he would have stayed in power until death, or if overthrown. The enabling act triggered a six- month period of rapid change through Germany, which is known as the Nazi revolution. Before the law passed (27th February) a fire mysteriously started at the Reichstag building which sent it to the ground. ...read more.

Middle

In the camps, prisoner's were worked, beaten and tortured to death. Social democrat and Communist officials were some of the many politicians groups slaughtered. The Nazis denied torturing their prisoners and sheltered their tracks by inviting the reporters and influential people to the concentration camps, where they would display the healthy prisoners (perhaps not even prisoners) who were at the time being treated very well. They were simply 'criminals' to the rest of Germany. By the late 1930s, deaths camps were increasingly common and few people came out. The criticisers of the Nazis were the people in there, and the people Hitler had prejudices towards. The people came under; Jews, socialists, communists etc. The disturbing thought is that, another point to Hitler's power was that his opinions and promises are what the public wanted, so his hatred towards the Jews and Communists is actually what a large quantity of Germans thought as well. Hitler would not have been able to persecute as many Jews etc as he did if Germans didn't actually agree with it. There hatred came from them thinking that Jews were all rich and had stolen all their jobs. ...read more.

Conclusion

Without Hindenburg's death Hitler wouldn't have become president by 1934, which was one of the actions helping him dominate Germany, as well as the night of the long knives, which helped as it gave him power and authority and left the people he had prejudices for scared, but showed the German public he means what he says. I also believe without the torching of the Reichstag, the emergency decree wouldn't have even been thought about. And it wouldn't have been voted for, but since the Opera house (where the voting was taken place as the Reichstag had been burned down) was full of SS men, perhaps effecting peoples voting. They were already positioned in the opera house when everyone arrived. I believe this was a big role in the enabling act passing. Without the enabling act, Hitler would not have been able to appoint himself president after Hindenburg dying. He wouldn't have been able to remove all other opponents and replace them with the Nazis so Germany became a one party state, he would not have been able to influence the education department or the courts, both very important. The education department meant new generations of supporters. Without the enabling act those actions would not have been able to take place. Therefore not gaining as much power, or dominating Germany. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sasha Lord ...read more.

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