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jack the ripper coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jack the Ripper COURSEWORK 1. From the source, we learn a number of things about the murder of Polly Nichols and Martha Tabram. We learn straight away in the first paragraph that the" two murders" were linked together, they "startled London". We're told that the murders were different from the ones London had seen before as the victims were the" poorest of the poor" and there didn't seem to be an adequate motive for these murders as the victims would have not had anything of value. We learn that the two murders were the works of a "demented being" and that he used "extraordinary violence" in each of the murders. The source only gives a brief description of the murder saying that the "excess of effort" was noticeable in both the murders. However, this source is not reliable to an extent because it has no real evidence and no statements from witnesses which means the information given might not be 100% true. It is also from a part of an article in the East-End observer which means the information given might have been exaggerated to make the story more interesting and help sell more newspapers. 2. The evidence of source C supports the evidence of source A and B to an extent but there are some key differences. For example, Source C supports source A in suggesting that the murder was violent. A explains how "extraordinary violent" was noticeable in the murders, and C describes the actual murder saying "there was a long incision" (neat cut) in the neck which means that the murderer took great care in what he was doing. C also supports A in implying that the victims were poor. A describes the victims as "the poorest of the poor" which could mean that the victims were really poor and or could be another way to suggest that the victims were prostitutes. ...read more.

Middle

Although there was no real evidence that the Ripper lived in Whitechapel, the police felt that he did and so decided to send the leaflets in Whitechapel alone. The language used in the leaflets was really formal and so therefore, these leaflets had little or no use to the police as a huge percentage of people in London didn't read or speak very good English. By sending out this plea, it showed the weakness of the police and how they couldn't cope with a big crime like this one as they were not educated enough." should you know of any person..." shows just how desperate they are and how much they don't know. "...you are earnestly..." also shows how desperate they are and how they're almost begging the people to tell them of anything they know. Source G is part of a letter from the home secretary which is explaining that offering rewards for a possible suspect is not a very good idea as it's doing "more harm than good". Police took thousands of statements from people pretending to be the murderer which made it harder for the police to catch the Ripper as there were so many possibilities and they didn't know which one of the people were telling the truth and which one was not. "there's nothing in the circumstances of the present case to justify a departure from this rule" means that the police force decided not to offer a reward for this case as they knew that people would do just about anything to get to that reward and that even innocent people would have probably been put forward even if they didn't commit the crimes, instead, the police decided to solve the case themselves in their own ways. They dressed as prostitutes and went out prostituting in the hope that the Ripper would target them. This may sound stupid but they had absolutely no choice and no evidence whatsoever and did not know where or when the Ripper would hit next. ...read more.

Conclusion

They also only sent out the leaflet to people in Whitechapel which could have been the reason why the murderer got away as the murderer could have lived outside Whitechapel. The wording on leaflet is also very formal which would have meant that half of the people in Whitechapel would not have understood it which would have meant very little help from the public. During the time these murders took place, the police force would change officers on a particular case after every two weeks. This was very stupid as after a particular officer had followed the case and gathered some information and understood it for the two weeks he was on duty, he would then be replaced and there would be a new person taking over the case who would have had to start from scratch as they didn't know a thing about this case apart from what they read in the papers which could have been exaggerated in order to get more customers. At that time, 2 different police forces had different jurisdictions which meant that they weren't allowed to go into each other's areas of authority. These were the London city police and the metropolitan police. They didn't share information between each other even if it would have been much easier to, they both wanted to have the glory of having caught the Ripper. They were doubling up on the work and could have had one easy job to do if they only worked together. This conflict between the police forces could have been the reason why Jack the Ripper found it so easy to escape and never get caught. In my opinion, I feel that the police were not to blame for Jack the Ripper escaping. They couldn't help the fact that computers were very expensive things to have then and it wasn't their fault that equipment for testing DNA, blood and finger prints were not invented yet so I feel that they did the best they could to stop the Ripper and couldn't help what they didn't have. ...read more.

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