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Jack The Ripper Coursework

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Introduction

History Coursework (Question 1) By Thomas Stevenson Describe Law and Order in the late 18th century? Law and order in the 19th century was a very primitive version of security. In 1798 the London City Police was established and in 1829 the Metropolitan Police was set-up with an extremely basic team of people to inhabit these new jobs. By basic, I mean the police had very few qualifications; most of the time you could get in to the force by being able to read and write. This was because many officers had simple jobs. An average day of a police officer would have been deterring crime, patrolling the streets for at least 14 hours of a day, lighting the street lamps and calling time out (curfew) in the city. Although officers were told to patrol the streets for at least 14 hours of a day, it was still extremely hard to prevent crimes due to the old winding streets in the big city. One place that was extremely difficult to police was the slum of the east end, Whitechapel. The police and public did not have one of the greatest relationships with each other: they were seen as helping the rich and ignoring any crimes from poorer parts of the city. ...read more.

Middle

Also at this time, more people were becoming literate, When the killer had finished his work, the press decided to create disasters for the public to read. The media made it possible for the Whitechapel murders and Jack the ripper to attract all the attention in 1888. Also in 1888, it was a chance for the police to prove their worth. They had been given a job and it appeared they were not doing it very well. The public were slowly beginning to dislike the police and enjoyed reading about their failures (so-called Victorian Fascination.) Considering this crime was never solved it gave a chance for gossip to run about the ineffectiveness and the excitement of a new unsolved mystery. With new discoveries in much of the world, a new stage production came to town as well. The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde blew the dust off science in the dark city of London and opened the door to constant fear of uncertainty. This paranoia was always funded by the brutality of the murders by Jack the Ripper. Petty crime was not unusual in London at this time, but a crime like those committed by Jack the Ripper was rarely ever seen, if at all. Have you ever heard of a man who murders women and has no apparent reason? ...read more.

Conclusion

It appears this way as the murders always occurred at night, so he could slip away into the night undetected. By leaving no clues or evidence, and working quickly (e.g. double murder with Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Eddowes.) Suspects were investigated but often they had alibis or no connections at all. The eyewitness description of the killer did not help either as it was very vague and left room for almost every man in Whitechapel to be investigated. Although the suspect obviously had medical knowledge, it still was not enough to narrow down the suspect list. The origins of the murders in Whitechapel, made it a lot more difficult for the police to work: at this period in time, the public generally did not like the police due to the fact they had not been around long and had suddenly come into a lot of power. Along drunkenness and depravity in the streets Racists were not uncommon in Whitechapel. The tension between groups made it much more difficult for the police and the busy working streets also washed away a lot of evidence. . Due to the circumstances of the time, the police did the best they could apart from not cooperating with each other (e.g. washing away the chalk writing.) They had unfortunate circumstances such as the place of the murders and lack of technology to help them through the investigation. Word count: 639 Coursework By Thomas Stevenson ...read more.

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