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John Keegan, a modern military Historian, suggests that Haig was an Efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War(TM). Is there enough evidence in sources C-K to support this inte

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Introduction

John Keegan, a modern military Historian, suggests that Haig was an 'Efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War'. Is there enough evidence in sources C-K to support this interpretation? Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain your answer. During the First World War over 8 million soldiers met their death; many generals have been under scrutiny for this fact. Haig in particular has come under fire for the 420000 soldiers who died under his command in the Somme. The traditional view of the British Army is of 'Lions led by donkeys' (Laffin). More recently historians have revised this view. John Keegan states that Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War'. I will assess if this view can be proven. Source C is a newspaper interview by Haig's son George in November 1998 on the 80th anniversary of the end of the war, published in the Daily Telegraph. ...read more.

Middle

Source E is a collection of Diary entries. The message of the source is that all of the soldiers were happy and ready for the battle. This source is not reliable as it was probably changed before being shown to the public, it is also only Haig's opinion. The limitations are that it is one sided, has no information about casualties and is largely inaccurate as Haig's beliefs changed his views of what he saw. On the whole this source is not sufficient evidence as it is unreliable. Source F was from a book called 'Great Battles of World War One' written by a modern Historian called Anthony Livesey and was published in 1989. The message is that it's giving both sides, one pointing out his failures which weren't done deliberately; he thought that he was doing the right thing. This source is reliable because it is not one-sided, it also wasn't written at the time. ...read more.

Conclusion

This source is not sufficient evidence. Source K was from an article by S. Warburton, published 'Hindsight: GCSE Modern History Review' in April 1998. The source does support Keegan's view on Haig 'Too much burden of guilt on one man'. It suggests that Haig was the best at the time, he does acknowledge that Germany lost people too and that Haig did make mistakes. This source is reliable as it is written by an historian meaning that he has done research on the subject, it is also a balance view. There are no real limitations to this source. Yes that this source is sufficient evidence. Out of these 8 sources, the sources that don't agree with Keegan's interpretation are C, D, E, G and J. Sources F, H and K do agree with Keegan's interpretation but only sources F and K that fully support it. I do not think there is enough sufficient evidence to suggest that Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled solider who did much to lead Britain to the victory in the First World War'. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amy Dack Haig Coursework (Part 2) 4041 ...read more.

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