• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

John Keegan, a modern military Historian, suggests that Haig was an Efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War(TM). Is there enough evidence in sources C-K to support this inte

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

John Keegan, a modern military Historian, suggests that Haig was an 'Efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War'. Is there enough evidence in sources C-K to support this interpretation? Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain your answer. During the First World War over 8 million soldiers met their death; many generals have been under scrutiny for this fact. Haig in particular has come under fire for the 420000 soldiers who died under his command in the Somme. The traditional view of the British Army is of 'Lions led by donkeys' (Laffin). More recently historians have revised this view. John Keegan states that Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War'. I will assess if this view can be proven. Source C is a newspaper interview by Haig's son George in November 1998 on the 80th anniversary of the end of the war, published in the Daily Telegraph. ...read more.

Middle

Source E is a collection of Diary entries. The message of the source is that all of the soldiers were happy and ready for the battle. This source is not reliable as it was probably changed before being shown to the public, it is also only Haig's opinion. The limitations are that it is one sided, has no information about casualties and is largely inaccurate as Haig's beliefs changed his views of what he saw. On the whole this source is not sufficient evidence as it is unreliable. Source F was from a book called 'Great Battles of World War One' written by a modern Historian called Anthony Livesey and was published in 1989. The message is that it's giving both sides, one pointing out his failures which weren't done deliberately; he thought that he was doing the right thing. This source is reliable because it is not one-sided, it also wasn't written at the time. ...read more.

Conclusion

This source is not sufficient evidence. Source K was from an article by S. Warburton, published 'Hindsight: GCSE Modern History Review' in April 1998. The source does support Keegan's view on Haig 'Too much burden of guilt on one man'. It suggests that Haig was the best at the time, he does acknowledge that Germany lost people too and that Haig did make mistakes. This source is reliable as it is written by an historian meaning that he has done research on the subject, it is also a balance view. There are no real limitations to this source. Yes that this source is sufficient evidence. Out of these 8 sources, the sources that don't agree with Keegan's interpretation are C, D, E, G and J. Sources F, H and K do agree with Keegan's interpretation but only sources F and K that fully support it. I do not think there is enough sufficient evidence to suggest that Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled solider who did much to lead Britain to the victory in the First World War'. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amy Dack Haig Coursework (Part 2) 4041 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Does General Douglas Haig deserve to be remembered as the butcher of the Somme(TM)?

    This source is talking positively about Haig. Lastly another example of Haig doing his job is shown in source 15. It was written be S.Warburton in a magazine article called 'Hindsight' in 1998.He stated that putting all the blame on Haig was not fair because trench warfare was a new type of war and not many generals

  2. Assesement of Haig and other Generals in WW1

    Haig cannot be blamed for this as his predecessor, Sir John French, frequently did this and was heavily criticised for decreasing the gap of authority between generals and soldiers. Haig did not want to make the same mistake as French which explains his actions.

  1. Did Haig deserve his reputation

    Tanks were too unreliable as they keep breaking down, aircraft was not used for bombing, only for seeing the position's, and Gas caused too many problems, and it had been used before with not much effect. Some people ague that the idea for Haig to use cavalry was outstanding, however,

  2. Gallic war

    - Caesar then left to visit his other province. - Caesar, Commentaries, boasts about how his troops were so well trained; said they "could suggest to themselves what ought to be done" and he "... blotted out forever the name of the Nerviis".

  1. Describe British rule in India at the end of the First World War.

    Why did all the attempts to reform the government of India fail? (20) All the attempts to reform the government of India failed because the British government did not manage to reach the Indian peoples needs, to a certain extent.

  2. Battle of the Somme

    The omission from source c is the mood of the soldiers. Seeing as George Coppard was a private he should have known the atmosphere around the camp. However, I understand how he just mentions the battlefield, as that would leave a more memorable and possibly frightening experience.

  1. Life In The Trenches - research and evaluation of the sources

    work at the same time, and when you were tunnelling, the layer of soil on top could collapse. From my own knowledge I know that it was impossible for anyone to see out of their trench if it was the correct depth, and because of this a firestep was built,

  2. The Crusades - diary of a Muslim soldier

    However, Bohemond fought like a ferocious, starving lion, taking down men wherever he went. However, the rest of his men did not fight as he did. There were a few that fought next to their commander, but they were easily killed by our superb archers.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work