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John Keegan, a modern military historian, suggests that Haig was an efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War. Is there sufficient evidence in Sources C to L to support this interpretation? U

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Introduction

John Keegan, a modern military historian, suggests that Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled soldier who did much to lead Britain to victory in the First World War'. Is there sufficient evidence in Sources C to L to support this interpretation? Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain your answer. When the Great War broke out in 1914, it took Europe by surprise. Britain was totally unprepared for the kind of war that broke out in Europe. There is some blame to be laid here, but I believe it cannot be fairly laid on the generals as this was not their agenda. Much of the bloodshed of the Great War, from the British point of view, stems from the lack of preparedness. The Army was very small and had the means to fight a continental war were missing - especially artillery shells. For the same reason, the munitions industry was very small and when the army expanded, the industry to support and arm the soldiers did not exist. This was not the fault of the generals although at some points the blame was squarely pointed at Haig. I do not think that he was the one to blame, because not only could no-one else have done any better, but there was not the means to do better than he did. ...read more.

Middle

When the old British Regular Army was practically destroyed in 1914-15, Britain was left with a poorly trained, amateur army because there were no senior officers left to guide the recruits who only had basic training. 'On the job' training in battle was costly in casualties and took time. The 'learning curve' of the young generals of Britain and France stayed consistent and only rose during the Somme battles of 1916. Some of this was due to the shortages of men, especially well-trained men, and equipment described earlier. It is also possible that the surviving Generals were too old in 1914 and 1915 but Britain had to use the generals they had left, the ones with some experience of command, of logistics, of warfare. Only later in the war, as the armies expanded, could younger, fresher, better commanding men be found and brought up to replace the positions that the older generation had left. Although Haig was of the older generation of soldiers in the British Army, having joined Sandhurst in 1883, he was the most experienced, effective and efficient General that the British Army had at the time. Source J suggests that Haig just wanted to 'move his drinks cabinet a few feet closer to Berlin', Captain Phillip Neame recalls that Haig was usually ...read more.

Conclusion

This was probably the reason he continued the onslaught upon the Somme and Passchendale, despite thousands and thousands of deaths on the first day of the Somme. He didn't know when to concede defeat or when to take the initiative to gain an advantage on the battle field. A great example of this is the failure to send re-enforcements to Schwaben Redoubt on the 1st July 1916. This is another reason why John Keegan is wrong in his opinion that Haig was a highly skilled soldier. Soldiers from both sides of no man's land described it as the 'muddy grave of the field army', this is why our Generals should not be blamed, we weren't the one's that failed to achieve their objectives, we succeeded and we gained victory, this is why that when Haig died in 1928 of a heart attack aged 66, tens of thousands of old soldiers turned out to see his coffin pass and more than 30,000 veterans followed it to the burial. He deserves a kinder, fairer judgement than posterity has granted him till now, and he is the one that led us to victory and this is why I believe that John Keegan is correct in his idea that Sir Douglas Haig was an 'efficient and highly skilled soldier'. 1269 Words. ?? ?? ?? ?? William Kennedy 11Y Candidate Number: 8337 1 Centre Number: 16325 ...read more.

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