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Life in Nazi Germany.

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Introduction

Life in Nazi Germany Life for the peoples of Nazi Germany cannot be simple classed as "good" or "bad", the standard of living for somebody living in Nazi Germany (and occupied territories) was, ofcourse, a matter of class and social position. In the post-1918 era, life in Germany had changed radically, following the armistice of 1918, the majority of Germany's citizen's were impoverished - the economy was all but completely destroyed. However no class was hit harder than peasant farmers - during The Great War farmers increased production greatly to feed the country and armies, when the war ended there was a vast surplus, so the farmers suffered greatly. During the "Golden Age" of the Weimar Republic living conditions were greatly improved, lifestyles were flamboyant, and people had freedom they had never seen in Totalitarian Germany, or before the unification of Germany under Otto von Bismarck. However, during the great depression of the early 1930's, German people suffered greatly, for the lower and middle classes life in the new Nazi Germany would have been a vast improvement on the Weimar Republic. ...read more.

Middle

roads, public buildings, etc were constructed on a vast scale, but the aims of Hitler and the Nazi's were not to help the German people, obviously they were preparing the country for war, and therefore great sums of money were used to the military, rather than in improving the lives of German's. During World War II the lower classes would have been conscripted into the Army, Germany needed vast numbers of soldiers on the Eastern front. During this time slave labour took over from the workers, Jews, Slavs, and others from concentration camps replaced paid workers, it goes without saying that life for slaves was inhumane, even torturous. Citizens of Nazi Germany were under fear of being shipped to concentration camps, murdered, and other atrocities. The Nazi's ruled Germany and after 1939 it's occupied territories by fear, in much the same way as the Soviet Union. Enemies of the State - communists, and other opponents of the regime - were sent to concentration camps in the east forced into slave labour, and faced almost certain death. ...read more.

Conclusion

Even firm Nazi supporters were not free from the fear of Nazi rule. Hitler often had General's shot if they disapproved of his war strategies. During the Battle of Berlin in 1945 Hitler ordered Goering shot treason - although the order was never carried out by the Nazi's. Rationing was introduced in Britain in the late 1930's, but the Nazi's did not feel the need to ration food until later stages of the war, ofcourse as the start of the war Germany expected a lightning fast victory, which they initially achieved. Vast quantities of luxuries of all kinds were imported to the Motherland, so there was no need for Germany to ration its goods - unlike Britain they did not rely so heavily on overseas trade. In conclusion, life in Nazi Germany was atrocious for certain aspects of society, but incredibly beneficial for others. While some aspects of life were good, others were poor. Many people wouldn't mind giving up their freedom aslong as the Nazi's performed for them. However many people would not give a dollar amount to the worth of their freedom, and justice, it is these people who would suffer under Nazi rule. Simon Lee Todd ...read more.

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