• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Life in Nazi Germany.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Life in Nazi Germany Life for the peoples of Nazi Germany cannot be simple classed as "good" or "bad", the standard of living for somebody living in Nazi Germany (and occupied territories) was, ofcourse, a matter of class and social position. In the post-1918 era, life in Germany had changed radically, following the armistice of 1918, the majority of Germany's citizen's were impoverished - the economy was all but completely destroyed. However no class was hit harder than peasant farmers - during The Great War farmers increased production greatly to feed the country and armies, when the war ended there was a vast surplus, so the farmers suffered greatly. During the "Golden Age" of the Weimar Republic living conditions were greatly improved, lifestyles were flamboyant, and people had freedom they had never seen in Totalitarian Germany, or before the unification of Germany under Otto von Bismarck. However, during the great depression of the early 1930's, German people suffered greatly, for the lower and middle classes life in the new Nazi Germany would have been a vast improvement on the Weimar Republic. ...read more.

Middle

roads, public buildings, etc were constructed on a vast scale, but the aims of Hitler and the Nazi's were not to help the German people, obviously they were preparing the country for war, and therefore great sums of money were used to the military, rather than in improving the lives of German's. During World War II the lower classes would have been conscripted into the Army, Germany needed vast numbers of soldiers on the Eastern front. During this time slave labour took over from the workers, Jews, Slavs, and others from concentration camps replaced paid workers, it goes without saying that life for slaves was inhumane, even torturous. Citizens of Nazi Germany were under fear of being shipped to concentration camps, murdered, and other atrocities. The Nazi's ruled Germany and after 1939 it's occupied territories by fear, in much the same way as the Soviet Union. Enemies of the State - communists, and other opponents of the regime - were sent to concentration camps in the east forced into slave labour, and faced almost certain death. ...read more.

Conclusion

Even firm Nazi supporters were not free from the fear of Nazi rule. Hitler often had General's shot if they disapproved of his war strategies. During the Battle of Berlin in 1945 Hitler ordered Goering shot treason - although the order was never carried out by the Nazi's. Rationing was introduced in Britain in the late 1930's, but the Nazi's did not feel the need to ration food until later stages of the war, ofcourse as the start of the war Germany expected a lightning fast victory, which they initially achieved. Vast quantities of luxuries of all kinds were imported to the Motherland, so there was no need for Germany to ration its goods - unlike Britain they did not rely so heavily on overseas trade. In conclusion, life in Nazi Germany was atrocious for certain aspects of society, but incredibly beneficial for others. While some aspects of life were good, others were poor. Many people wouldn't mind giving up their freedom aslong as the Nazi's performed for them. However many people would not give a dollar amount to the worth of their freedom, and justice, it is these people who would suffer under Nazi rule. Simon Lee Todd ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Women in Nazi Germany

    However it is debatable as to whether these changes were predominantly negative or positive. There are two groups of women living at this time who would have viewed the changes differently. Those who would have viewed the changes negatively would have included Jewish women, independent and career minded women, strong

  2. Does the film The Battle of the Somme provide a realistic picture of life ...

    Source 15 is an extract from the diary of Sergeant S. V. Britten. He claims that they 'had no breakfast,' and they had 'no food or water.' This claim is supported by source 16, in which A. West states that their meals were 'never hot, worse than ordinary camp food.'

  1. Youth in Nazi Germany

    Biology taught Nazi ideas about races and mainly the superior Aryan race. German taught them about national pride and the heroes of Germany. Geography taught them about the German land and what should be the German land. RE became less important and most students dropped it by 1937.

  2. Daily Life in Nazi Germany:

    Hitler youth girls were taught obedience and discipline. Girls were taught to be dutiful wives and mothers. Members of the Bund Deutscher Madel were educated in the skills needed for domestic chores, nursing, and hygiene. Daily life in Nazi Germany was manipulated from the beginning of Nazi rule.

  1. Hitler's Early Life

    The document threatened a year in prison and a fine if he was found guilty of leaving his native land with the intent of evading conscription. Hitler was arrested on the spot and taken to the Austrian Consulate. Upon reporting to Salzburg for duty, he was found "unfit...too weak...and unable to bear arms."

  2. Nazism and the New Age.

    The nurture of the new humanity included the need to "encourage the growth of a violent, domineering, intrepid, cruel youth... nothing weak or tender in it." (Angeberts, p.209, Rauschning quoting Hitler) This reached its climax in SS training, and it corresponded to the Nazi view of "pure" Gnostic, Hindu and

  1. Education in Nazi Germany

    the State in the National Socialist spirit.' This made clear the Nazi's determination to shift the focus of education away from the needs of the individual and the development of his potential as a human being to the requirements of the community of nation and State, of which the individual was a member and to which he must subordinate himself."

  2. History controlled assessment - Germany between the wars

    Germany suffered the loss of 1.7 million young men, with another 4.3 million men being wounded during the conflict. The total casualties amounted to over 7 million, though this includes some men who were prisoners or listed as missing. http://www.schoolshistory.org.uk/ASLevel_History/week2_theweimarconsitution.htm The Weimar Republic After Germany lost the First World War,

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work