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Long and short-term causes contributed to the March 1917 Revolution.

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Introduction

Question Two Explain how long and short-term causes contributed to the March 1917 Revolution. (10 Marks) Answer Two Firstly, a long-term cause is a factor that started well before the final event. It may well go back hundreds of years and has been mounting up over the years, usually getting worse instead of better. A short-term cause is one which is a recent factor contributing to the final event. Sometimes ten years or even a couple of days, depending on the circumstances. In this case, a long-term cause could have begun any time and then up to around 1914. A short-term cause follows on from that date, around three years before the revolution. I chose 1914 as the cut off point because August of that year was when WWI began, and this made many more factors increasingly important. There is also another category, 'Trigger'; this is an event immediately before the Revolution, which is like the last straw, when no one can take anymore or when one last bad decision is made. Out of the categories... > Social Structure > and economic hardship > Romanov misrule > Opposition Groups > Influence of Rasputin > World War One Which contributed to the March 1917 Revolution, the long-term causes are as follows. ...read more.

Middle

There were serfs who did all the manual labour for the capitalists, and got next-to-nothing for a long day of work. The capitalists were known to be shot by the army, who were mislead by the church. All this happened under the ruling of the Royal Family and some aristocrats. The 80% of the population who were Russian had appalling living and working conditions. The social structure of Russia lead to many revolts by the worker. The aristocracy had vast estates and lead elegant lifestyles. There was such a large gap between the two. Ninety-four percent of the population of Russia had no say in the government! The fact that Russia is an autocracy means that the Tsar only called the Duma when he wanted, most of the time the decisions were left up to him and his incompetent advisors. Because of this, there was no freedom of speech or press, and the Cossacks and the Okhrana (secret police) enforced this. The social structure had been a problem to the millions of Russians for generations and they realised that things could be better for them if there was reform. The economic hardship in Russia also began hundreds of years ago and was bad because of the social structure, and thus, a long-term cause. ...read more.

Conclusion

The country suffered greatly from the economic effects of the war. I think that the trigger to the beginning of the revolution was World War One, it influenced all other factors and the revolution happened during it. As you can see, many factors contributed to the fall of the Tsar and the start of the Revolution in March 1917. As historians, we cannot guess and say that without one factor the revolution would or would not have happened. The causes continued to mount up, and in Russia's case, it was only a matter of time or events that determined when the revolution would occur. It was not any individual reason that triggered the revolution but a bit of all of them. They are all linked in one way or another but all of them stemmed from the original autocratic Romanov house. This isn't to say that Romanov misrule is the main factor but it was the one that contributed the most over time. In my opinion, the long and short-term causes were not all as important as each other but were all contributing factors in one way or another. The Russian Revolution History Coursework July 2001 Camilla Marcus-Dew 10.4(3) Page 4 of 4 The Russian Revolution History Coursework July 2001 Camilla Marcus-Dew 10.4(3) ...read more.

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