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GCSE: Germany 1918-1939

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 11
  • Peer Reviewed essays 8
  1. Marked by a teacher

    Treaty Of versailles

    5 star(s)

    Furthermore, Clemenceau resented Wilson's more generous attitude to Germany. They disagreed over what to do about Germany's Rhineland and coalfields in the Saar. In the end, Wilson had to give way on these issues. In return, Clemenceau and Lloyd George did give Wilson what he wanted in Eastern Europe (which was self-determination), despite their opinions about his idea of self-determination. However, this mainly affected the other four treaties, not the Treaty of Versailles. Clemenceau also clashed with Lloyd George, particularly over Lloyd George's aim- which was not to treat Germany too harshly.

    • Word count: 2883
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Why did Hitler become Chancellor of Germany in 1933?

    5 star(s)

    During the 'roaring twenties' Germans ignored Hitler and he seemed not to worry people too much with his programme of discrimination. But when the Great Depression ruined their lives, he became well noticed and was able to begin his journey to chancellorship. The continuing bitterness that many Germans felt contributed to the deep anger about the First World War and the Treaty of Versailles which was blamed on the government. This created an underlying bitterness to which Hitler's viciousness and thinking appealed to, so they gave him support.

    • Word count: 1519
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Why was Hitler able to become chancellor of Germany in 1933?

    5 star(s)

    Without a strong leader and a weak government made German citizens turn to more extreme groups. The Treaty of Versailles is one of the factors that helped Hitler to become chancellor. The Germans were disgusted by this treaty, devastated and felt bitter at the total sum that had to be paid and accept the war guilt clause. At the end of the year 1922 no reparations had been paid by Germany. This led to a terrible economic crisis caused by the occupation of the Ruhr a (key industrial area of Germany) by the French and Belgian troops. In order to try to pay the reparations, Germany started to print money and it led to a hyper-inflation.

    • Word count: 1966
  4. Marked by a teacher

    Was any one of these reasons more important than the others in Hitler's rise to power?

    5 star(s)

    The desire in Hitler and others around him was one of the most important reasons why Hitler joined politics. He felt that his country had been betrayed by the 'November Criminals' and that the Treaty of Versailles was too harsh and unfair considering many believed that the German army was still unbeaten. Despite all of this, the Treaty of Versailles was also the most important reason on the list because it was so unfair and because of some of the terms for peace which it stipulated. The main problem was the great loss of German land to other countries and the loss of Germany's industrial heartlands in addition to the great level of reparations.

    • Word count: 1026
  5. Marked by a teacher

    What was the most important factor for Hitler becoming Chancellor in January 1933?

    5 star(s)

    This point was very significant to Hitler becoming Chancellor. If they had not acquired so many seats in the Reichstag now Hitler and the Nazis would have probably remained a small party. But after the depression the Nazis maintained a high amount of seats in parliament, becoming the biggest party in the Reichstag in 1933, when Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. However the impact of the depression can only partly explain Hitler becoming Chancellor in 1933. Another factor was the weaknesses of the Weimar Republic.

    • Word count: 779
  6. Marked by a teacher

    The main purpose of the Nazi curriculum was to prepare boys to be soldiers. Do you agree?

    4 star(s)

    I am also going to discuss some other factors in the Nazi curriculum, such as the heavy influence on education of Nazi ideals, and the preparation of women to be mothers and housewives. In my initial answer to the statement, I disagree that this was the main purpose. There are many ways in which this statement can be considered incorrect because, in English lessons, children were taught to analyse the speeches of Hitler, and texts about the Hitler Myth. Children began to develop Nazi ideals, such as that the 'Fuhrer' (Adolf Hitler)

    • Word count: 752
  7. Marked by a teacher

    Most German people benefitted from Nazi rule 1933-39 Do you agree? Explain you answer.

    4 star(s)

    A further fall in unemployment came when Hitler brought about rearmament and introduced conscription. Although the newly employed were earning little, at least they were receiving money. To people who had been unemployed and starving, 'work and bread' was something amazing. Also, the schemes meant that new facilities were being constructed in Germany benefitting the German people further. However, it did come at a cost. To achieve this, many Jews and women were sacked and replaced with non-Jewish men. People who were already working also benefitted. Workers were allowed to go on holidays for the first time.

    • Word count: 636
  8. Marked by a teacher

    Why was the Weimar Republic so unpopular with many Germans between 1919 and 1923?

    4 star(s)

    The workers would still be poor and the rich would still be rich. They wanted the workers to have power. This contributed to the Weimar Republic's early unpopularity because there are a group of people (the communists) who know that they will not agree with the key policies according to them. Hyperinflation made money worthless by 1923. People with savings or pensions suffered a lot. This was a politically a bad start for the Weimar Republic because the people who lost the value of their saved money, blamed the Republic for hyperinflation; they were responsible for printing more and more notes to help pay the reparations.

    • Word count: 1317
  9. Peer reviewed

    Explain why the depression of 1929 was a godsend for the Nazi Party

    5 star(s)

    This situation was a godsend for the Nazi Party as it enabled them to gain public support. Having lost faith in what they already felt was an indecisive Government, and after the 'stab in the back' myth having been circulated throughout the country, Germany became increasingly hard to govern. Hitler, an inspiring and energetic speaker, took this opportunity to present himself and the Nazi party to the German people.

    • Word count: 508
  10. Peer reviewed

    Hitler - Jews

    5 star(s)

    So, Hitler adopted strong anti-Semitic policies; they were not the most popular of his decisions, but they were carried out with great strength. There were 5 main stages to the persecution of the Jews: * Livelihoods were attacked, * They were singled out, * Nuremburg Laws, * Violence, * Final Solution. At first, the Jews' livelihoods were attacked. Many of them were sacked from their jobs, such as those who were teachers and doctors. They weren't allowed to serve on a jury or work with Aryans.

    • Word count: 526
  11. Peer reviewed

    Was Life Better For Germans In 1939 Than in 1933?

    4 star(s)

    Hitler also helped the army and the unemployed by introducing conscription. This created a larger army and also gave those men conscripted jobs. Hitler also made more money available for the army. On July the first 1934, the night of the long knives, Hitler eliminated key SA members. This destroyed a potential opponent for the army. The SA were also said to be like thugs so by eliminating them It seemed that he was helping the general people by removing a thuggish group of people and replacing them with a more disciplined group, the SS.

    • Word count: 698

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • "By the beginning of 1929, the survival prospects of the Weimar Republic looked good." Discuss the extent to which this statement can be agreed with.

    "In conclusion, it can be seen that while there were some positive economic, political and foreign policy developments from 1924 to 1929, these were merely on the surface and covered innumerable flaws in the Weimar system. The lack of understanding of democracy in German society, the negative perceptions and revisionist ideals leftover from the Versailles Treaty and the structurally induced economic weaknesses were all evident throughout the time period, and would have caused the republic eventual downfall. The great depression of 1931, while it sped up this process, was merely a catalyst."

  • "Economic Factors brought the Nazis to power in Germany" To what extent is this true?

    "Looking at all the conclusive facts and arguments, the conclusion that can be reached is that Hitler came to power due to a combination of many different factors. However, the backbone of Hitler's rise was based on the great economic instability of the time highlighted by the two crisis in 1923 and 1929, which enabled Hitler to exploit the situation. Then Hitlers policies appealed to everyone due to effective propaganda. Secondly, the problems with constitution (article 48) which undermined German democracy and the weakness of the Weimar Republic that was widely hated helped the Nazis. This was because of their lack of suppoert and weak constitution. However in the end it was only political intrigue in the right-wing that brought him into office."

  • Discuss the view that the Versailles treaty created as many problems as it solved.

    "In saying that the treaty of Versailles was a complete failure and created all Europe's post war problems would be a massive overstatement, to say it was merely the best the Nations could do with the given situation and that all the problems which arose were little to do with the treaty would be an understatement. The real answer lies somewhere in between the two. The options of the Nations when creating the treaty were small but in being naive and not thinking forward to what certain clauses of the treaty might bring about they created problems. Yet no one could anticipate the rise of Hitler and the Nazi's in Germany and although the treaty aided them in their rise it was one of many factors that lead to the rise of the Nazi party in post Versailles Germany. In conclusion the treaty created a lot of problems some avoidable, some not, its resources were small yet its dealing with its resources was poor. Yet when the nations wanted such polar opposites for a post war Germany and Europe in general it is expected that some problems could and would arise. Keynes said post the signing of the treaty that "The Treaty by overstepping the limits of the possible, has in practice settled nothing"."

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