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GCSE: USA 1919-1941

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  1. The boom of the 1920's would scarcely have been possible without the automobile industry. Discuss

    Henry Ford used mass production techniques to help build cars quickly and cheaply. His assembly line took the work to the man and not the man to the work so that people did the same job to a high standard on each car. Because they only needed to be trained on one aspect of the job they were unskilled workers, and didn?t need to be paid as well as more skilled motor manufacturers; however, as the hours were long and the work was intense, Ford increased wages to a huge $5 a day, the highest in the country to attract workers.

    • Word count: 780

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • c) To what extent did all Americans benefit from the boom in the 1920's?

    "In conclusion a lot of Americans benefited from the boom in the 1920's, but not all. Anyone that got involved with the Ford car industry benefited greatly because it opened many opportunities to other people and got other industries booming. The number of unemployed people in America was going down slowly and more people had jobs and were earning. People now were enjoying life and having fun. Women had all the freedom they wanted. People who were hardest hit were the farmers (agriculture), Black Americans and also the Native Indians. Less than half of Americas population were enjoying the booming years, but the majority of America remained poor. To be precise 60% of the Americans were living in poverty and remained in poverty regardless of the economic boom. The people who were suffering from poverty in America suffered a great deal. Blacks, ship builders, coal miners, textile workers were affected greatly. These people made up 60% of Americas population and they were in poverty. In comparison to the rich 40% of Americans population such people in: new industries, car industries, businesses, electrical. These people benefited due to the high wages and could afford to buy the new products on the market."

  • Discuss the reasons for the popularity of gangster films in the early 1930s. Indicate to what actual social context they responded, and why these films became increasingly controversial.

    "Robert Warshow attributes the small length of production of gangster films to the fact that "America, as a social and political organization, is committed to a cheerful view of life"26 and the gangster genre does not promote this ideology. Due to the actions taken by censorship committees it seems as though even when in truth there are troubles within a society these issues are not allowed to be projected into the countries culture, this is reflected by Warshow's sentiments that "every production of mass culture is a public act and must conform with accepted notions of public good"27. Had the gangster genre become popular at a period when there was not such a great deal of civil unrest then perhaps there would not have been such a public outcry in result of the material included, but because of the social effects of and the admiration given to the gangsters within such films the government tried to abolish. This conclusion is supported by Warshow's suggestion that "At a time when the normal condition of the citizen is a state of anxiety, euphoria spreads over our culture like the broad smile of an idiot"28."

  • To What Extent Did The New Deal Pull America Out Of The Depression?

    "My opinion of to what extent did the New Deal pull America out of the depression is that they didn't. All the New Deal did in my opinion was to keep the country from going into complete poverty and kept it running. Even when Roosevelt thought that the New Deal had done enough to regain recovery it slowly started to slip back into depression. This would have just kept happening if they had carried on with schemes for making jobs. The only reason that America got out of depression was because of World War Two. Brad Freislich"

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