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Nazi Germany

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Introduction

Mohammed Bandali Nazi Germany Explain the nature and purpose of the 'Hitler Youth' movement. a) To establish a stable future for the Nazi regime, Hitler was determined to gain control of the upcoming generation that was Germany's youth, to do this he created several groups for both boys and girls to teach them Nazi ideology and how to be the 'superior race'. Hitler's youth movement was made compulsory to join in 1936 and from then on boys at the age of 6-10 wore enlisted to the 'Pimpf', which translates as little fellows, here they took part in exercises such as hiking and camping. On surpassing the age of 10 they underwent a test from them to reach 'Deutsche Jungvolk' (or German young people). Only after this wore they enrolled in 'Hitler youth' when they wore between the ages of 14-18 and there they wore trained on military discipline. The Hitler youth was also used as a way teaching children in anti-Semitism, pride for Germany and allegiance to Hitler. Young children were expected to read books describing how Jewish things and people were evil. There was also the SRD which was a patrol service that would check that all the members of the Hitler Youth were looking smart and that they were carrying a clean handkerchief and comb, which defines the importance of the movement. Baldur Von Schirach led the Hitler youth organization and he had the idea to create individual years for the Hitler youth movement ...read more.

Middle

By encouraging women to do this and offering rewards for large families Germany's population would grow meaning more young boys being trained to being soldiers and more young girls turning into mothers so Hitler can fill the land he was planning to take control over with Germans. Though there were some exceptions to the policies set by the Nazi's, as if you was a woman of high importance and closely linked to Hitler personally there was some differences. Such as the film director Leni Riefenstahl, whom Hitler admired her work dearly. When he first attended one of her films showings, Hitler sought out the young director and after a very short time appointed her as 'Film Expert to the National Socialist Party'. Over the next five years Riefenstahl made several films in which Hitler had requested, which in a state where women played a secondary role to men, Riefenstahl was given a free hand by Hitler to produce propaganda films for the Nazi regime. Hitler described Riefenstahl as 'the perfect German woman'. Another exception was Eva Braun which was Hitler's 'wife' whom he married only when both had reached a mutual decision to commit suicide a day after their marriage. Eva Braun met Hitler when she was 17 and at the age of 19 At the age of 19, she became Hitler's mistress, received a house, expensive clothes, fast cars and French perfume - but no wedding ring, she also was not pushed into having children which goes against Nazi policies. ...read more.

Conclusion

and people wore expected to come to the police if they heard of any unrest against Nazi policies if they didn't they too would be punished, people wore too afraid to stand up against Hitler and his SS men. Also some Germans even though not liking Hitler's rule preferred it over any left wing communist groups, as Hitler did well in lowering unemployment rates buy implementing building, road and house works. Also his order of conscription of men into the army further reduced the amount of unemployed and Germans found thousands of jobs in factory work and weapons production so they benefited from Hitler being in power. People found themselves at a higher standard of living and did not wish to sacrifice it and go back to the days of the depression. Propaganda played a drastic part in why the Nazi's wore able to maintain control with little opposition in Germany, the use of blaming the Jewish people and making out Hitler to be a god made people side with the Nazi regime. The repetitive speeches brainwashed the people into feeling compassionate towards Hitler's cause but I do feel the pure fear of Hitler's SS men did stop many of the German public from speaking out in fear of execution or being murdered and also the fact that all the good Hitler had brought to the country people did not wish to return to their previous state with inflation and mass unemployment. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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