• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Nazi Germany Revision. This article is divided into two sections. One will deal with Nazi Methods of Control and the other with Life in Nazi Germany.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Nazi Germany Modern European and World History This article is divided into two sections. One will deal with Nazi Methods of Control and the other with Life in Nazi Germany. NAZI METHODS OF CONTROL As we have seen in The Rise of Hitler, within 18 months of coming to power the Nazis had erased all forms of political opposition; within six months political opponents had been rounded up, incarcerated and outlawed; within a year the independence of the regions had been crushed and in June 1934 the threat from within the party had been eliminated in the Night of the Long Knives. How did the Nazis keep control thereafter? i) Police State Nazi Germany was a police state. To assist the ordinary police there was the Gestapo (secret state police) under the command of Reinhard Heydrich. The purpose of the Gestapo was to find enemies of the regime, arrest them and send them to Concentration Camps. ESTIMATED NUMBERS IN CONCENTRATION CAMPS YEAR NUMBERS DEATHS 1933 50,000 6,250 1934 56,250 7,300 1935 65,850 7,900 1936 71,150 8,500 1937 76,850 9,200 1938 83,050 33,200 1939 132,900 66,450 These were not extermination camps, but conditions were very harsh and as can be seen from the table, inmates did die in them. ...read more.

Middle

A dozen 'ringleaders' of this movement were hanged in Cologne in November 1944. However, such opposition as existed remained isolated and confined to grumblings about material conditions. By far the most serious threat was the attempt to remove Hitler by the July Bomb Plot of 1944. A group of leading army officers tried unsuccessfully to assassinate Hitler. As a result over 5,000 were killed in retaliation. v) Conclusion Overall Nazi control was pretty effective. However, it must be remembered that nearly half the electorate had voted Hitler in - i.e. he was in fact a popular leader. In addition, his success in solving Germany's economic problems and his remarkable achievements in foreign policy must have meant that by 1940 his approval rating was probably sky high. Moreover, with the onset of war any opposition to the regime could justifiably be portrayed as unpatriotic and treasonous. In fact the Nazis remained pretty much in control until the collapse of the regime in May 1945. LIFE IN NAZI GERMANY i) The Economy There is no doubt that Hitler was able to solve the problem of unemployment: UNEMPLOYMENT January 1933 6,014,000 1934 3,773,000 1935 2,974,000 1936 2,520,000 1937 1,853,000 1938 1,052,000 1939 302,000 How was he able to do this? ...read more.

Conclusion

Women did not, however, serve in the armed forces. iv) Conclusion To sum up: for many, life in Nazi Germany was not too bad (up to about 1941/2). The economy recovered, there was full employment and there was a growing feeling of optimism. The youth policy did seem to have some success, producing a generation of young people devoted to Hitler; and the number of live births increased from 971,174 in 1933 to 1,413,320 in 1939 which suggests that the marriage policy was working (though ironically more women were working in 1939 - 12.7 million- than in 1933 - 11.5). Because we know that this was an evil regime and because we know what followed - war and genocide - it is often difficult to appreciate that Hitler was popular and that life for the majority was probably not unpleasant - until 1941/2 at any rate. As one commentator has put it: With all the success Hitler had, Germany was actually a wonderful place to be alive, unless you were Jewish, you had strong political convictions either as a socialist or a communist, or you believed in individuality and the freedom of the individual; but that is never the majority of the people. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Women in Nazi Germany

    It grew in importance within the Nazi power structure, and eventually claimed thousands of members. The SA carried out numerous acts of violence against socialist groups throughout the 1920s, typically in minor street-fights. The SS in particular had tremendous power and control, and one that the Nazi's knew would help them to stay in power.

  2. Free essay

    How important was propaganda to Nazi control over Germany in the years 1934-39?

    The Nazi Germans targeted lots of different types of people with propaganda from single women to young people he promised a there

  1. What was it like to live in Nazi Germany? How did life change for ...

    All aspects of their lives were geared towards Nazism. It is hard to know whether youngsters enjoyed and benefited from this. At the time I think that the majority of youngsters would have favoured this dramatic change in lifestyle as Hitler made them feel like very important people and they were told that they were the master race.

  2. The Rise of Hitler Revision notes.

    Clearly the attempt to become a mass movement and capture power by the ballot box was not working. It would take another major economic crisis to make the Nazis electable. However, these years in the wilderness saw some significant organizational developments.

  1. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    Despite this, there were still many examples of Jewish armed resistance. In the ghettos of Eastern Europe, Jewish fighting groups were formed. Jews who managed to escape from the ghettos joined the partisans (the anti-Nazi resistance movement) in the forests.

  2. "The most important reason why there was little opposition in Germany towards the Nazi ...

    Defiance to the regime was simply not tolerated. The situation was apocalyptic to the Christian church. Hitler had completed corrupted the Protestant church and replaced it with 'worshipping' Hitler. In conclusion, the key to the fact that there was little or no opposition in Nazi Germany was the Police State.

  1. The Role of women in Nazi Germany.

    However, not all the techniques that the Nazis used to expand the population were done pleasantly. Abortion became practically illegal, and this would mean that there would be an increased number of births, as once women became pregnant, they had no choice but to have the baby.

  2. How did Hitler keep control of Nazi Germany?

    The whole of Germany was being controlled and closely watched by the Nazis, making sure no one had an excuse to be against them, no matter what age they were. Mass rallies were also invented as a celebration every year to rejoice Hitler?s greatness.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work