• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Nazi life in Germany

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Life in Nazi Germany Society When Hitler joined the National Socialist Party he claimed it was more than a party and was to rule Germany; he recoiled at the idea of liberal individualism and tried to enforce the idea of 'Volksgemeinschaft', 'a people's community'. When Hitler became Fuhrer he aimed to improve the German economy and to reduce unemployment. Hitler succeeded at this by using conscription, forcing men over 18 to john the armed forces; he also reduced unemployment by banning women from the armed forces. Hitler also developed many things we use today in modern life, for example: Motorways (autobahn), jets, synthetic fuels, guided missiles and microwaves to name a few. In fact, the first magnetic tape was a recording of a Hitler speech. Youth Hitler tried to influence young people who would later become Nazi adults by inventing the 'Hitler Youth', a club similar to scouts, that took in children aged 7-18. ...read more.

Middle

Sexism was encouraged in Germany and many women lost high-ranking jobs, such as being doctors or teachers. To make sure men in the army were well looked after, women were banned from the army so they could look after their husbands when they got back from war. Unfortunately, due to this policy, female unemployment rose in 6 years from 4.8 million to 5.9 million. Birth rates soared during 1933-1939 as Hitler and the Nazis gave grants to families with more children. The government even gave medals to women for producing lots of children. Leisure Germany was host to the 1936 Olympics, and though Germany still won the most medals for a country, a black American, Jesse Owens, won the most for an individual. This infuriated Hitler who obviously was against Owens competing as he was an African-American. ...read more.

Conclusion

Anti-Semitism was a huge part of Nazi life and was actively encouraged by the government. They also mistreated other minorities, such as blacks, disabled and homosexuals. Hitler's hatred of Jews dated back to WW1, which he believed was lost due to the Jews. Hitler was a product of anti-Semitism in Germany, not the creator as many people believe. Hitler's hatred translated into economic boycott and racial laws, therefore triggering government inspired hate-violence. Of course this all ended in the mass-extermination of the Jews in the holocaust. Hitler liked to use his enemies as scapegoats for his mistakes or actions, for example the Communists after the Reichstag fire and the Jews for WW1. It is not surprising that during all this violence many Jews emigrated to other countries; as many as 150,000 emigrated between 1933-1939. The whole Nazi society had to attack the Jews, if individuals or groups did not they were ridiculed publicly. There were many organised attacks and riots on Jewish shops. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. To what extent did the Nazis achieve an economic miracle in Germany between 1933-1939?

    In 1933, he believed it was a 'matter of will,' though he had economic aims based on his election promises to provide workers with work and bread, to rescue the middle class, to carry out land reform in the peasants' favour and to revive business fortunes.

  2. Thr opposition of the Church.

    This distressed many of the army's leaders. Hitler, who needed the military to establish total control, realized the problem Rohm presented. Hitler needed Rohm out of the way in order to solidify his command and win the army's support. The Army was in no way won over by Hitler immediately.

  1. Hitler's Early Life

    Jews were tied to "internationalism" by Hitler. The name of the party was changed to the National Socialist German Worker's party, and the red flag with the swastika was adopted as the party symbol. A local newspaper which appealed to anti-Semites was on the verge of bankruptcy, and Hitler raised funds to purchase it for the party.

  2. Daily Life in Nazi Germany:

    programme of 25 points published in 1920 stated that it disapproved of women working. Adolf Hitler claimed that the emancipation of women was a slogan invented by Jewish intellectuals. He argued that for the German woman her "world is her husband, her family, her children, and her home."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work