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Nazi Sourcework

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Introduction

B4- Nazi Germany, c 1930-39 (a) By studying Source A we have found that the Nazis believed that the German women should be committed to Germany by raising families. The Nazis believed that women should marry and cease working, as long as they have worked a minimum of six months. Source A shows that the Nazis encouraged German women to marry and to create large families by giving marriage loans of 1,000 Reichsmarks, therefore many people would marry for the much needed money. The Nazis felt that women should refrain from working because they want to give their jobs to out of work men to reduce the unemployment in Germany. (b) The evidence provided by Source C is supported by Source A, but Source B opposes this view. Source A is an official Nazi law for the Reduction of unemployment in 1933 and Source is a timetable for a girls' school in the 1930's. Both these Source are extracted form Nazi society therefore they both must support the others opinions. Source C, the girls' school's timetable, shows the ideology which the Nazis were establishing in the girls minds was that they were here to breed with Germans, raise a family and which races were acceptable. According to the timetable in source C the Nazis weren't very concerned with the girls growing up to be well educated because they did not set any subject which help them to apply for jobs. ...read more.

Middle

The Nazis did not include any women working in the fields because they were discouraging women from working. Source E is an extract from the writings from Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda designer and an important Nazi. Goebbels wrote that women should breed and in addition to that they should pretty themselves for their husbands. Therefore their husbands will gather food, stand guard and fight of enemies. Source E states that Goebbels wrote that men would take care of the gathering of food, standing guard and fighting off enemies, this shows that Goebbels, a leading Nazi, believed that the men would take care of the important issues and leave raising the families to the women because the Nazi's policy was to encourage women to stay at home and raise families. (d) "The Nazi regime turned women into second-class citizens", I agree with this view because they were used by the Nazis only to repopulate Germany and were obliged to become housewives by Nazi policies. During Nazi regime women in reasonable professions, excluding a few who were very talented and could be useful to the Nazi regime, were demoted, received less wages and were placed in uncomfortable jobs where their health was placed in jeopardy. These factors discouraged women from seeking work and most of them settled into the Nazi policy. According to Source B during the time of the Weimar Republic women had more rights, they were able to vote, many could earn the same wages as men for the same job and they were employed in various professions. ...read more.

Conclusion

The government wanted to dispose of any party which they believed could trouble them in the future by placing them in new prisons, consequently resulting in the Communists and the Social Democrats living in fear and stopping them speaking against the government. (b) Source C is supported by the evidence presented by Sources A and B because Sources A, B and C all give evidence discouraging other parties. Source is a law passed in July 1933 which ended the existence of opposition parties in Germany, the law states that the National Socialist German Workers' Party should be the only party in Germany and that anyone who starts another party shall be imprisoned and serve between six months and six years in prison. Source C is a law which retrained other parties interfering with the Nazis plans in government. The Nazis wanted a complete and utter control in German politics and this law meant that this goal could be accomplished. Article 2 in Source C, which meant that you could be arrested for organising a political party, created a fear and silenced the voices of those who would still oppose the government. Source A is an extract from the Volkische Beobachter, the official Nazi newspaper in March 1933, it supports the evidence presented in Source C because it is a Nazi newspaper which promotes the laws passed by the Nazi government. The newspaper extract comments on the rival parties who could become a danger to Germany which Source C reports ...read more.

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