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Northern Ireland Essay

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Introduction

Northern Ireland Essay For many years now, Northern Ireland has been rocked with major problems, violence and conflict, mainly in its own streets. There are several reasons to explain the causes of this, mainly the issue of religion. However like in the most current and previous conflicts, other factors to Northern Ireland's problems include power, land, conflict in politics and money. For a long time politicians have attempted to find a long lasting peace for Northern Ireland and also, set up various peace programmes in aid to settle the conflict. However none have proved a great success, which just brings up the question once again, 'why is there still conflict in Northern Ireland and can it ever be resolved. Our best hope currently lies with the Good Friday agreement, yet this is still being severely tested by both sides. In my essay I will cover and explain the roots of the conflict and go into depth of the key themes that present problems. I will judge and cover the peace attempts and give fair assessments on their worth. Also I will discus issues that still exist today and what is being done about it. The roots of conflict in Northern Ireland date back to around hundreds of years ago to the medieval time period, when the majority of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland were completely Catholic. England became a Protestant country once Henry VIII wanted Northern Ireland to become Protestant. Once again the factor of politics came onto the table. The Republic Of Ireland wanted Northern Ireland to join together and unite, so Ireland could be its own country. However there was some major differences and it became a battle between the two, which has yet to of been resolved. Both Catholic and Protestant are of the Christian faith, but have some slight differences. The faith Protestant was formed against the catholic faith by a group of Catholics who began protesting against. ...read more.

Middle

These were; sending in the army, imprisoning all the paramilitaries and sharing the land of Ireland between them. Despite these seeming like good ideas on the surface, these so called solutions just hindered the problem of the lack of peace all the more. Sending the army meant that more violence would occur instead of preventing it. It would be the English army that was sent, and with them being all pretty much Protestants, this would look biased to many Catholics. Although when they were first sent to Northern Ireland in 1969 when the police had lost control it looked like a good idea and proved well, however it soon changed once the Unionist Government of Northern Ireland sent the army to search a Catholic area, which meant that people could not leave their homes for 35 hours, after four people were murdered. The English army now became the Catholics enemy. This just reduced chances of improving the situation. Imprisoning the paramilitaries would have sparked a massive crisis, as it would have infuriated them and made them want to seek revenge, guess what leading back to violence, that would just crop up upon the streets of Northern Ireland. Sharing the land would lead to the Catholics protesting and arguing that they did not have equal amounts, as there was at this time more Protestants than Catholics in the area, so therefore more land would be given to the bigger side. However partition seemed like a good idea to the British Government at the time because it would mean that there would be less conflict. This would hopefully lead to the goal of hope in achieving peace. Partition meant the division of ire land in separating the sides for good. This would be that with the majority of Protestants being in Northern Ireland would take that side, and where there being mainly Catholics in the Republic they would stay there. ...read more.

Conclusion

Attitudes have changed in recent years, because people who used to be violent or even terrorists have now realised that violence is not necessarily the right answer, for the simple reason that it wasn't achieving what they wanted, but it was only making what they wanted more out of reach. I also think that people began to grow sick of seeing and hearing about everything around them getting constantly destroyed. All of the opposition, whatever the topic, be it religion, power, land, money or politics, need to come together in agreement in a calm discussion, whenever things feel like they are getting out of hand and that the Good Friday Agreement terms are slipping away. Although the Good Friday Agreement is being severely tested, I think that so long as people stick to the Good Friday Agreement and actually try as much as possible to spread the peace and to not be violent, problems should not worsen. Although this is all very well saying, could it actually work however? In answer to the essay question, there is trouble in Northern Ireland because of issues which date back hundreds of years, religion, power, politics, land and money. There is still conflict today because the past haunts each side and winds each other up, leading to dispute as constantly said through out this essay. In my opinion I believe there will always be trouble affecting Northern Ireland and it is a result of its own past and religious areas. The trouble still happens today because the past haunts some people to the extent in which they are unable to let go of the prejudice or discrimination which they or their families or ancestors have suffered in the past. It will definitely take more than a scrap of paper to reconcile two angered separate groups, and the best hope I think is teaching the younger generations and retaining their attitudes to start fresh, a clean Ireland, a new Ireland. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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