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Northern Ireland - What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and the Loyalists/Unionists?

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Introduction

History coursework: northern Ireland What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and the Loyalists/Unionists? The Nationalists and the unionists represent two different religions the Nationalists support the catholic religion and the Unionists support the Protestant religion, as well as supporting a different religion they also have different political views for example the Unionists wish to remain part of the U.K, while the Nationalists seek independence they wish to rule as an independent Ireland. There are both violent and peaceful political parties examples of violent Nationalist parties would be the IRA (Irish Republican Army) another party Sinn Fein supports there methods of violence. Parties who do not use methods of violence would be the social Democratic and Labour Party also known as the SDLP they are strictly against any type of violence in Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

The two different parties have different beliefs in what goes on in Ireland The Unionists wish for only people in northern Ireland to have a say on what goes, but the nationalists wish for the majority of Ireland to decide in the future of Ireland. There is not only one type of unionist groups there are many: * Ulster Unionist Party-, the UUP was established in the 19th centaury, to defend the beliefs of the Northern Protestants. Also known as the official Unionist party, they ruled Ireland from 1920 to 1971. * The Democratic Unionist- the DUP was founded in 197 by Ian Paisley. The DUP have taken many working class supporters away from the UUP, its tough thinking has called for the destruction of the IRA * The Orange Order- established in1795 and is the biggest unionist party in Northern Ireland today. ...read more.

Conclusion

They wish for the whole of Ireland to be united but * Are opposed to the violence of other groups such as the IRA. The SDLP wishes for peace in the whole of Ireland. * Sinn Fein- backs the IRA in the methods they use and the beliefs they support. Many Catholics with working class status support the group in mainly Belfast and Derry. Sinn Fein sends up candidates for election throughout Ireland but only receives significant support in some parts of the north. * IRA- the Irish Republican Army- established in 1919, uses fierce methods to oppose British presence in Ireland. The Ira have killed large numbers of British soldiers and Irish police officers also setting off many bombs which have killed people in both mainland Ireland and England. ...read more.

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