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Plutarch's Life of Ceasar

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Introduction

Mark Zaborniak History 1110 Unit 2 N. Conradt The assassination of Julius Caesar as depicted by Plutarch shows how the dictator was assassinated on the Ides of March in 44 B.C. Plutarch wrote on a number of historically significant figures, and most appear in his The Parallel Lives. Written in an attempt to show how the political figures influenced their domains, Life of Caesar describes why Caesar was killed and the final moments and death of Julius Caesar. The first paragraph of the source tells us that Caesar was not unaware of the impending threat against him. A prophet imposed the knowledge on him sometime before, but the ruler was not inclined to heed the warning, and fate proved to catch up with him in the end. ...read more.

Middle

Plutarch says that until the dictator saw his friend upon him he resisted valiantly but gave up and succumbed to death as Brutus lunged at him. One of the most obvious issues that gave rise to this document is the murder of one of the world's most powerful leaders itself, as this would have lasting consequences upon the Roman Republic, the ensuing Empire, and the controlled territories. It was written to show future generations that in an attempt to rule the world and fancy oneself immortal, all things must come to an end. As it was not written during the remain of the Roman society, Life of Caesar does little to fulfill needs to the people it was written about. ...read more.

Conclusion

The textbook most likely includes Life of Caesar because it gives a good description of an event that many people do not fully understand. The particular idea that most believe Caesar to be a savior and "good" leader is ironic after reading Plutarch's description of the event and of who Caesar really was. Life of Caesar is also a good source to show the brutality and effectiveness of the Roman legions and military power. As with all of the primary sources included in the text, it is brief in its attempt to show what life was like in ancient times, but upon reading the work in full, one can gain a better understanding of the impact of the Roman leader upon his domain, and why a coup was desired to protect the civilization from which our own form of government is taken. ...read more.

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