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Promise and Performance, FDR and the New Deal in the USA, 1933-45.

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Introduction

Timed History Essay Louise Todd 12N (Mr Beamish) Promise and Performance, FDR and the New Deal in the USA, 1933-45 A) What does source 1 reveal about Roosevelt's views on the role of government? It is my personal opinion that President Roosevelt believed that the government of America needed to get more involved with the affairs of the state. At the beginning of his speech Roosevelt states that 'A small group' of people had taken almost complete control over 'other people's' property, money, labour, and even 'other people's' lives. The 'small group' that Roosevelt refers too are Capitalists; people such as Henry Ford who in previous years had managed to gain so much wealth that they now had great economic status and control over others. By saying that the power had been concentrated into 'their own hands' Roosevelt is suggesting that power had only been invested into a small group of people, the wealthy business owners and employers. The 'other people' Roosevelt describes in his speech are ordinary American citizens, and Roosevelt believed that the capitalists should not overpower them, and there should be more equal opportunity. Roosevelt also says that the public should have a right to appeal against the government, and at the end of his speech he says that ...read more.

Middle

Different firms were encouraged to agree codes of practice to stop unfair competition such as price-cutting, also to agree on matters such as minimum wage and working conditions within the industry. Finally, Roosevelt wanted to ensure that the USA did not return to the excesses of the 1920's. The way Roosevelt proposed to deal with this problem was by passing to measures to regulate the stock exchange. Firstly Roosevelt set up the 'Truth-is-Securities Act' in 1933, which required brokers to offer their clientele realistic information about the securities they might be selling. Secondly, Roosevelt set up the 'Securities Act' in 1934 to oversee the stock market activities and prevent fraud. The two acts proved to be highly successful despite opposition from Wall Street insiders, and Wall Street gained a new credibility. C) Use you own knowledge Roosevelt tried to improve the lives of the poor and disadvantaged within the United States in the years 1933-45 in many ways. Roosevelt set up many of what were known as 'alphabet agencies' to conquer the problems within economy and society. In 1933 Roosevelt passed 'The Economy Act' which cut government and ex-soldiers' pensions. The promotion of industrial recovery was a priority for Roosevelt and the New Deal and 'The National Recovery Administration' (NRA) ...read more.

Conclusion

The people in these states of the US suffered greatly because dust storms spread from the Dust Bowl area. The drought was the worst ever in U.S. history, covering more than 75 percent of the country and affecting 27 states severely. These people did not benefit from the New Deal. To conclude I would say that Roosevelt looked as if he were helping the people of the US. In my opinion he certainly did more than Henry Hoover, however even though Roosevelt set up such a vast variety of schemes to look after 'the common man' He seemed to leave out certain groups of people. IT was certain that his main focuses were Agriculture and Industry, Roosevelt wanted to make the USA economically strong once more, and although the majority of people benefited, lot's of others did not, and found that because the alphabet agencies only employed certain groups, they had no choice but unemployment. FDR made a promise that the government would become more centralised and involved with the US as a whole. I believe that he kept to this promise, and he knew how to play up to the media and keep his promise (Fire side chats). What he did not do however, was reform the lives of all the poor and disadvantaged within America to the full extent that he promised. (50 mins) ...read more.

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