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Question 3: The New Deal was not a complete success. Explain how far you agree with this statement.

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Introduction

Question 3: "The New Deal was not a complete success". Explain how far you agree with this statement. Due to the Wall Street Crash in 1933 the New Deal was introduced. The New Deal helped the unemployment problem but did not solve it. The New Deal stopped things from getting any worse in the short term, however in the long term only World War two solved the unemployment crisis. Some historians believe that the New Deal was partly a success and partly a failure. In the opinion I think that the New Deal was a success. The New Deal had aimed to provide relief through the Federal Emergency Relief Act (FERA), this aimed to provide direct cash to the needy. $500 million has been given to states to help the starving and homeless people. The money was also used for employment schemes, nursing schools (so parents could go out during the day to find a job), soup kitchens, and blankets. The FERA was up to some point a success, for this aim many things had to be provided, if the government had stopped providing money this aim wouldn't be a success. ...read more.

Middle

It was used to buy materials and employ millions of skilled workers to build schools, housing, hospitals, bridges, courtrooms and dams. The PWA also built ten ships and 50 airports. But this solution was only short-term. The New Deal laws clearly dealt with the problem of poverty among black people and the poorest sector. The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) gave the government power to control the prices. They paid farmers to produce less and destroy some of the food they had already produced. They hoped that food prices would rise because there were short supplies. The idea worked-between 1933 and 1939, farmers' incomes doubled. However, the government was heavily criticized for this idea, the government was destroying food and forcing up prices to help farmers at a time when millions in the city were starving. The New Deal did a lot to help agriculture, however did have some problem it helped large firms the most and the problems of 'dustbowl' continued. Projects such as the Tennessee valley authority (TVA) ...read more.

Conclusion

The judges in the court were conservative and did not like the way the New Deal allowed the government to become so involved in the economy. The judges found the National Industrial Recovery Act and the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) unlawful. Roosevelt did not want the judges to dismantle the whole New Deal. A After he was re elected in 1936 he tried to change the judges so the court was pro New Deal. This did not work, but the court realized they could not change the New Deal. In conclusion I think that The New Deal was a success as the Federal Government got involved for the first time. As well as this acts such as the WPA and the CWA provided relief for the economy. The Banking Act and the Securities Act helped solve financial problems and the AAA helped agriculture. The NRA improved working conditions in industry and women became high achievers. However there were some failures the problem of 'dustbowl' continued, unemployment did not go away, most New Deal laws were designed to help women rather than men and the New Deal had a lot of opposition. It was the war that finally solved the problem of unemployment. ...read more.

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