• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Representations 1,2 and 3 all give an idea of how the Nazis were so effective in controlling Germany in the years 1933-1939. Representation one is a Nazi propaganda poster created to gain support from the German population.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Part B (ii): Analyse and evaluate representations of history. Representations 1,2 and 3 all give an idea of how the Nazis were so effective in controlling Germany in the years 1933-1939, despite them being individual and published in the past and present-or for example when representation 1 was published it was formatted as: present, future, future, representation 2: Present, past, past, and representation 3: present, past, future. The representations have different source types; representation one and three as primary sources because they are now being used by historians to analyse the Nazis and representation three is secondary because it is using the events of the past to give a summary, they are all effective in their own individual ways, depending on what the reader wants to discover or understand. The best representation however, needs to hold characteristics which show that it is impartial to a high degree, and something that essentially edifies people in a way which they will feel satisfied due to the knowledge or understanding gained as a result of studying the given representation. Representation one is a Nazi propaganda poster created to gain support from the German population. ...read more.

Middle

The representation you could say, is objective because it gives a balanced argument, it's not fully unbiased because nothing is, but is does try to give an impartial argument before the conclusion. It manages to tell us how the Nazis were able to control Germany in diffused manner; it doesn't give much detail and is rather brief, but it maintains to be informative. The representation is very effective because despite Walsh's opinion at the end, you are still able to come about your own conclusion, and it does give carefully observed information. Representation 3 is a speech (which is sometimes considered a poem) by a Pastor called Martin Niemoller. The speech was written around the time that World War 2 ended, though the exact date is unknown due to different versions of the speech. The main purpose of this representation is to show what happens when nobody stands against something that is evidently wrong, because it is believed that won't affect them or what is called 'political apathy'; in this case German individuals as the whole were not paying close attention towards hatred that lead to radical behaviour/actions. ...read more.

Conclusion

The other two representations are also respectively useful in their own way; if I wanted to know how Nazi propaganda posters looked like and what they involved, then I'd refer to representation 1, if I wanted to know the experiences of individual Germans or those who survived the scrutiny of the Nazis then I would turn to Pastor Niemoller's speech and infer from what he said, but if I want to study and understand the Nazi's impact, then I would need something like Ben Walsh's textbook because the other two don't glue together because they essentially contradict each other and they are ambiguous if they are to be placed to me without me knowing where they originate; it's highly unlikely I would know that representation 1 was a propaganda poster, let alone commissioned by the Nazis because all I can see is a content looking family, and there is not much information I can refer to, and representation 3 could be talking about any event in history because a lot of political parties opposed communists and trade unionistis and it's known in history that Jews have been opposed. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jamila Hussen 11 A History Coursework Part 3. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. To What Extent Was Nazi Germany a Totalitarian State 1933-1939?

    Thus Hitler was able to extend and secure his leadership party making it even harder for other parties to oppose and win. Hitler was supported truly by the upper-middle class. He offered them a security blanket towards communism. However the majority of germane citizens were middle-class.

  2. Free essay

    How important was propaganda to Nazi control over Germany in the years 1934-39?

    He got rid off the freedoms of speech, privacy and the right to be in groups. The Nazis had the power to listen to people's phone calls invade peoples houses without a warrant and read peoples mail if they wanted to.

  1. How did the Nazis control the German people between 1933-1939?

    Hitler also realised the importance of the workers when trying to rebuild Germany as a major European force. One way in which Hitler kept the workers in their place was by fear, he was a brutal man and was not afraid to quickly crush anyone who tried to stand up against him.

  2. Why did the Nazis come to power in Germany in 1933?

    causing unnecessary uproar and because of Hitler's large popularity Hitler was an obvious choice. Von Papen believed if Hitler was chancellor and he was vice then Hitler would be the man in front, and people would listen to him and papen could tell him what to do from behind.

  1. To what extent did the Nazis achieve an economic miracle in Germany between 1933-1939?

    Exports, however, experienced the same trend as imports, which was not what Hitler did want to happen. In 1928 the value of exports was placed at 12.3 billion but by 1926 this value had been reduced by 250% to just under 5 billion marks.

  2. Why did the Nazi Party gain popularity in the years 1933-1939?

    Because people were worried about the future of the economy, they voted for the Nazi Party. They were also scared of the idea of a Communist country. (Nazis used the Reichstag Fire incident to emphasise the reason why a person should not vote for the Communists.)

  1. How Far Did The Nazis Control Everyday Life In Germany After 1933

    Despite the removal of women from professions, in 1939 more and more women found themselves working in the factories, to produce the necessary materials for war. Even though the women were working, they still had to run their families as the stereotypical Nazi housewife.

  2. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    was recycled for use in products such as rugs and socks. Day to day life in the concentration camps was brutal, with the Nazis regularly carrying out beatings and acts of torture.The bodies of those killed were destroyed in crematoria, and the ashes buried or scattered.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work