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Source D is form an Irish Roman Catholic who describes (B Devlin) her school days, which implies a degree of bias because her Vice Principle "mother Benignus" had her family suffer at the hands of the British. Her view on Protestants

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Introduction

Source D is form an Irish Roman Catholic who describes (B Devlin) her school days, which implies a degree of bias because her Vice Principle "mother Benignus" had her family suffer at the hands of the British. Her view on Protestants was that they were not Irish, and she even had separate views on teaching about Irish history. This source is an adaptation form b Devlin "the price of my soul, 1969", this date indicates that this source could be primary but yet again it could be bias. This source is limited in a way but still gives us sufficient evidence to show how troubles could have broken out, because Protestants and Catholics Were divided as communities and were taught in separate methods, they were also separated so when the two meet either side would contradict each other. Therefore resulting in violence. Source E is a Protestant cartoon from the nineteenth century showing "ERIN" (Ireland) bound by ropes by a Catholic Priest. This is portraying conflict between the two religions. There is a message portrayed by the cartoon and it is that Catholicism has control of Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

However it is sources like these that did infact add insult to injury, in that it was probably sold to papers and both Catholics and Protestant would be outraged reading this. One side could feel disgusted that uniformed officers are acting in this way at a peaceful civil rights march. And the other side could say that the media is quick to snap a photograph of a RUC officer beating a marcher but where is the photograph showing the cause for their attack IE violent marchers or perhaps a weapon of some sort. So really this source has not helped either side prove or gain in any way but just aggravated the situation. Source I is a photograph of a violent situation where loyalist ambush civil rights marchers at Burntollet in January 1969. This picture is not very clear and does not tell us much about the ambush. As the picture is not clear you cannot tell whether there is actual violence. This piece of evidence is primary but it could be bias. There seems to be something censored in the photograph as every one is looking in the direction direction were it is censored. ...read more.

Conclusion

Witnesses and evidence contradict each other through bias in their stories and the sides that they take. Photographic evidence can be read two ways as can scientific and again this will be perceived through the side that you take. It is the evidence that contradicts itself and other hard facts. It is because the evidence can be read in two ways that it has produced so many interpretations and will continue to do so throughout time. Looking at Bloody Sunday is a bit like analyzing the color red. Depending on the perceiver's personality or current state of mind red can be viewed in many different ways. It can show passion, aggression, rage, danger, royalty, love, authority or hate. Neither of the above are correct and neither are incorrect but we can all agree that if there is an underlying emotion that we associate with something visual i.e the color red, it will be enhanced once the two meet. It is in the same way that we may view the events of Bloody Sunday. There is underlying emotions within people concerning that day and these can be brought to light by different factors. Depending on what it is that the person involved has connected as a visual stimulant different things will arouse different emotions. ...read more.

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