• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Sources D and E aren't about Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Question 3 Sources D and E aren't about Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme? Source D is a still from the TV series 'Blackadder goes forth' it shows 2 officers discussing an imminent attack on the Germans. This was written years and years after the war. Source E is a cartoon from a British magazine published in February 1917 at the time of the war, so automatically you know that source E is going to be bias source D is going to be bias in some ways as it is a comical and it takes the mick out of one of either the Germans of the English to make people laugh. In the first speech bubble in source D Blackadder says, "my instincts lead me to believe that we are at last about to go over the top." ...read more.

Middle

When it says about Haigs drink cabinet being 6 inches closer to Berlin, it is saying that he doesn't have a lot to do with what goes on at the front he just stays with his drinks cabinet at the back. Blackadder was doing 2 things when he said that, firstly he was making it clear to the audience who were watching the show what George meant by what he said before an secondly, he was making it clear about how they felt about it in a way. The whole point of the show 'Blackadder goes forth' is to make people have a picture in their heads of what it was kind of like in the war and to make people laugh. Source D doesn't really have much to with Haig and the battle of the Somme but it would tell the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme some things about it, like Haig stayed at the back all of the time, which doesn't help with the studying much. ...read more.

Conclusion

he replies by saying, "the absence of the General, Sir." This cartoon give the basic idea of what it was like in a rehearsal. For example, it explains that the General doesn't get involved with a real attack, and it shows how the men are dressed and organized. Source E would only tell a historian who is studying Haig and the battle of the Somme that the General is absent during an attack which isn't really much use. From the information that I have got, even though both sources aren't really on about Haig and the Somme, the information gives you a very basic idea of how things worked, I would say that source D doesn't give any good information for a historian on the battle of the Somme. Source E shows that the Generals were cowards because they wouldn't fight and they stayed about 20 miles behind the trench. I wouldn't say that either of the sources are very useful to a historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme. Shannon Phillips ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. The Battle of the Somme

    In total, a million and a half shells would be fired. The attack was planned to last five days. The 1st two would be concentrating on cutting the wire and knocking out the German artillery with shells. For the next three days destruction of the trenches and machine-gun posts was to take place in addition.

  2. The Somme - source related study.

    "The 1st day of the Somme" by Martin Middlebrook. The only places that the British and French didn't have this result was at Montaubon and Mametz, where the French and the Surrey Regiment did break through, only to fall back due to the fact that the cavalry didn't come to push through.

  1. Why did the Germans become involved in the Battle of Stalingrad?

    Russia, under Stalin, was one of the biggest communist countries in the world. Also, the Russians were Slavs, Hitler had believed the Slavs to be inferior. He intended to use the Slavs as Slave labour for the ayran race. Hence Hitler's actions, aims and racist views, and his hatred of

  2. Haig and 'The Battle of the Somme' - source related study.

    Source D is a still from the T.V series 'Blackadder Goes Forth', showing two officers discussing an imminent attack on the Germans. To some extent I disagree that there is no use for a historian studying Haig and the Battle of the Somme to refer to this source as the source is very negative and very cynical towards Haig.

  1. The Battle of the Somme

    The sight of an approaching cloud of gas was an effective terror weapon in itself, and the effects of the gas were more horrific. Exposure to poison gases caused temporary blindness, severe burns, choking, and sometimes death. It was, however, only an effective weapon if the wind blew in the

  2. General Haig and the battle of the somme

    Those two objectives are what the British wanted to achieve at the battle of the Somme and did to a certain extent. 3. I think that both sources are useful in their own way but source H makes more sense to me because it is from a man that was

  1. Dunkirk and the battle of Britain.

    Thomas Kerr see himself as superior to the troops when the evacuation was a team and nations effort and when he says " The sight of our naval uniform was resorted some order to the rabble" Maybe the troops were in a poor state, but surely one man would not of made a miraculous effect on the BEF.

  2. How useful are Sources A, B and C to an historian studying the attitudes ...

    However as I read through the source I found there was some truth in this account as I felt it touched upon some truths concerning people's perception towards Haig. Although the article was published in the Daily Telegraph in 1998, we are not informed as to when Haig's son quoted it.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work