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Sources D and E aren't about Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme?

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Introduction

Question 3 Sources D and E aren't about Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme? Source D is a still from the TV series 'Blackadder goes forth' it shows 2 officers discussing an imminent attack on the Germans. This was written years and years after the war. Source E is a cartoon from a British magazine published in February 1917 at the time of the war, so automatically you know that source E is going to be bias source D is going to be bias in some ways as it is a comical and it takes the mick out of one of either the Germans of the English to make people laugh. In the first speech bubble in source D Blackadder says, "my instincts lead me to believe that we are at last about to go over the top." ...read more.

Middle

When it says about Haigs drink cabinet being 6 inches closer to Berlin, it is saying that he doesn't have a lot to do with what goes on at the front he just stays with his drinks cabinet at the back. Blackadder was doing 2 things when he said that, firstly he was making it clear to the audience who were watching the show what George meant by what he said before an secondly, he was making it clear about how they felt about it in a way. The whole point of the show 'Blackadder goes forth' is to make people have a picture in their heads of what it was kind of like in the war and to make people laugh. Source D doesn't really have much to with Haig and the battle of the Somme but it would tell the historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme some things about it, like Haig stayed at the back all of the time, which doesn't help with the studying much. ...read more.

Conclusion

he replies by saying, "the absence of the General, Sir." This cartoon give the basic idea of what it was like in a rehearsal. For example, it explains that the General doesn't get involved with a real attack, and it shows how the men are dressed and organized. Source E would only tell a historian who is studying Haig and the battle of the Somme that the General is absent during an attack which isn't really much use. From the information that I have got, even though both sources aren't really on about Haig and the Somme, the information gives you a very basic idea of how things worked, I would say that source D doesn't give any good information for a historian on the battle of the Somme. Source E shows that the Generals were cowards because they wouldn't fight and they stayed about 20 miles behind the trench. I wouldn't say that either of the sources are very useful to a historian studying Haig and the battle of the Somme. Shannon Phillips ...read more.

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