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Study source A. Do you agree with this interpretation of the importance of the Battle of the Somme? Use the source and knowledge from your studies to explain your answer.

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Introduction

Study source A. Do you agree with this interpretation of the importance of the Battle of the Somme? Use the source and knowledge from your studies to explain your answer. Source A was part of a report written in December 1916 by General Haig. It was written to the Cabinet about the aftermath of the Somme. It says that the Somme was a success, that the Germans were ready to surrender and even though they had not gained much land, they had weakened the German army considerably. I agree with source A when it says that the German casualties were higher, which they were. However that is only if you are comparing them with the British casualties not the Allied casualties. ...read more.

Middle

Which it did because the Germans had to take men from Verdun for support at the Somme. This allowed the French to beat them. The battle of the Somme also showed that the British were able to fight for a long period of time without surrendering. I disagree with source A where it says that the Germans were beaten men and that they were ready to surrender. This wasn't true because they clearly weren't ready to surrender because of the spring offensive. They gained back all the land lost in the battle of the Somme and more. Also they weren't expecting defeat, not until the Americans joined the war. Also the fact that the Allies didn't gain much land, which was the entire point of the war, didn't seem to matter to Haig. ...read more.

Conclusion

However this is only part of a report written by Haig there could be more on the failures of the battle, however it is unlikely as Haig wouldn't want to admit he'd done anything wrong. I have therefore come to the conclusion that, I disagree with this source. I disagree with this source because of the context in which it is written and who wrote it. As Haig wrote it, it will obviously be biased, as Haig won't want to accept any responsibility for the failures of at the battle of the Somme. Also as it was written to the Cabinet Haig would want to prove to them that he was a capable leader, who could help win the war. 1 ...read more.

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