• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Study sources D & E and your own knowledge. Why despite the suffragette activities, had women not gained the vote by World War 1?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Study sources D & E and your own knowledge. Why despite the suffragette activities, had women not gained the vote by World War 1? There were a number of reasons for women not gaining the vote by the outbreak of the First World War. There was a prevalence of traditional ideas regarding the role of women; the Liberal government of the period was on the whole opposed to votes for women, there were many pressing issues for the government to deal with and the most important factor was the response to the suffragette campaign. The most important reason for women not getting the vote by the outbreak of the First World War was the response to the suffragette campaign. ...read more.

Middle

Another main reason why women did not get the vote by 1914 was that the Liberal government were on a whole against votes for women. Herbert Asquith the prime minister at the time was strongly against votes for women as well so he could use the parliamentary system to avoid bringing votes for women up. From 1906 the Liberals lost by-election after by-election and needed to make sure they retained there majority. Votes for women were not a vote winner as only about 10% were actually in favour so the government never passed the bill. MPs were also against votes for women as it states in source E "I have no hesitation in voting against the principle of giving votes for women" this was a speech given by an MP and shows that a lot of people in the government were against votes for women. ...read more.

Conclusion

Complex foreign affairs delayed women's suffrage. The plan to grant home rule in Ireland led to civil unrest and together with the outbreak of war people felt votes for women was a minor issue and felt it could be ignored. Another reason why votes for women took so long to happen there was a prevalence of traditional ideas regarding the role of women, like queen Victoria spoke very strongly against the female suffrage. A book written by Marie Corelli had this written in it, "Women were and are designed to make voters rather than be voters themselves". Many male MPs felt that the government shouldn't go to great measures to introduce votes for women. Women were thought of as weak and should stay at home to bring up the children. All these reasons led to the prevention of women's suffrage by the outbreak of the First World War. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. "The suffragette campaign made it less likely that women would be given the vote." ...

    of support, meaning that they were more likely to get the vote. During the war the suffragettes stopped their campaigning to join the war effort in munitions factories, as ambulance drivers and nurses on the front line. This showed the government that they deserved to get the vote because they

  2. How important were Haig's tactics in bringing an end to WW1?

    He had planned a bold invasion of Turkey. Churchill first stage of the plan was to capture the Gallipoli peninsula, north of the Dardanelles using the Royal Navy alone. Then by attacking Gallipoli, he would first capture the Turkish capital, Constantinople, and so knock Turkey out of the war.

  1. Source Work- Women in World War 1

    Also at this time, women began doing direct war work such as munition factories. The poster is specifically for women as it says 'women, come and help'. This is quite significant, because an argument against enfranchisement from the government was that 'women don't give an input in war, so why should they vote?'

  2. World war 1

    A tactic which was used by the Commanders of both sides was called, 'Race for the Sea'. Joffre and Falkenhayn realised that the advantage now lay to the North between Aisne and the Sea. This caused a race between the two sides; a race to take control of this position.

  1. History Revision for year 11. The Liberal Reforms, the Beveridge Reforms and the ...

    The Liberal reforms were a start. Now at least workers had some protection from some of the main causes of poverty. The Liberals had never intended to take over complete responsibility for the welfare of the British people, they had wanted to provide some sort of a safety net to prevent people falling into absolute poverty.

  2. Votes For Women - Source related study.

    Dunlop-Wallace refused to eat at all in prison so was released after a few days. Many other Suffragettes saw this as a good tactic to use, so it became a popular way of getting out of prison quickly. However, the Government felt they were being taken advantage of so started

  1. Why, despite the suffragette activity, had women not gained the vote by the outbreak ...

    The government said the problem with the Irish Nationalists took priority and they brushed aside the women's suffrage bills. This was exaggerated when the Liberals had to concern themselves with problems in the Balkans and the war. As a result of losing the bills, the suffragettes became even more aggressive, losing even more support.

  2. First World War Sources Questions

    The source says that it was due to Haig's "organisational ability" and "grim determination" that the German army was eventually defeated. This shows that Haig had the skills required to be a good general, and that he had the ability to lead the British army.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work