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The aims of the Irish Civil Rights movement were similar to those of the American Black Civil Rights in many ways.

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Introduction

The aims of the Irish Civil Rights movement were similar to those of the American Black Civil Rights in many ways. Both the Irish and American Civil Rights movement had educated middle class supporters who knew their rights and wanted to improve their opportunities and way of life. The Irish Civil Rights movement which was formed in February 1967, in fact emulated its American counterpart, who had forced the U.S Congress to pass the Civil Rights Acts in 1964 and 1965. They both wanted improved and equal opportunities in area like government, the law, education, and employment. They both believed in achieving their aims through civil protests. The NICRA was founded in 1967 by a wide range of organisations and individuals including members of political parties and trade unions. It was not just Catholics. Students, socialists and conservatives also were members. Their aims included wanting to expose discrimination in employment, politics, housing education and the Law. ...read more.

Middle

"Jim Crows" laws meant separate restaurants and other facilities. In 1954, twenty states had separate schools for blacks and whites. The "separate but equal" ruling made by the Supreme Court in 1896 didn't work in practice- white schools were better and therefore later job opportunities/education were often better. Blacks had the worst paid, unskilled jobs on farms and in factories. They couldn't get the best jobs in public offices- e.g. town mayors. Poor housing also existed in North America. By the 1960's, black Americans began a campaign for equality to end all these things, like discrimination and segregation of blacks in employment, education, law, government and housing. In this way, its aims are like those of the NICRA. However the Irish wanted to end discrimination in areas of religion, and the USA wanted to end racial discrimination. Both movements originally set out as peaceful movements. The NICRA's main activities consisted of the June 1968 Austen Currie sit-in to highlight discrimination in housing. ...read more.

Conclusion

There were further violent clashes at these marches. This year (1969) saw increased violence and extremism against the slowness and inadequacy of reforms. This led to British troops being sent to Northern Ireland, and increased IRA activity, who were demanding total separation from Britain. In America, the black Civil Rights 1964 Civil Rights Bill was passed, as was the 1965 Voting Rights Bill. Both of these gave more equality. But this was still seen as "too little, too late" and was followed by violent Civil Rights riots in Watts Co, Los Angeles. A new movement called "Black Power" was established. They believed in using violence to achieve their aims and wanted black power and dominance, not just simply integration into the white man's world. In conclusion, there are many similarities within the aims and methods of both movements. Both wanted to end discrimination and segregation in a number of areas and both gained some successes. Both felt that because they had had limited success within each particular movement, that there was a cause for more violent demands and methods later on in the history of their movements. ...read more.

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