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The Atomic Bombings of Japan

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Introduction

The Atomic Bombings of Japan Question 3: In my answer, I plan to evaluate the reliability of Source K, which is a film. I will have to look at why it was made, who made it, the date of the film, and its tone. This answer will show the strengths and weaknesses of the films content through this I will determine if the source is biased or not and how it can be trusted. Source K is a British production made by the BBC in 1995. It was part of a series called "Fallout" and it focused on the Atom Bomb and its effects. The fact that the source is a British production made in 1995 after the Cold war had ended; it has no reason to be biased. Source K was made at the end of the Cold War and reviewed the second half of the 20th century. The video focused on the experiences of the people who were affected by the bomb and the people who worked with nuclear arms and nuclear power. The video considered different perspectives and opinions from the Russians, Americans, Japanese and Americans. This film also showed primary footage of the Cold War between 1950-1980 that was suppressed by the government and not shown up until 40 years later. The information that was given was one sided and reassured the American people. ...read more.

Middle

This film was made to let the people see and to share in the USA government's delight at the discovery of the Atom Bomb. America also filmed the dropping of the Atom Bomb. They showed a film of workers signing the bomb before it was used on Hiroshima. Harold Agnew was one of these workers; he was interviewed for "Fallout" in 1995. He commented that the bomb was a "Beautiful great thing", he also remembered his hatred of the Japanese. He was very proud of being part of the group that was responsible for dropping the bomb. The USA government used this film to allow Americans to share in its achievement at developing and using the bomb. The cabin crew on board the US planes filmed the dropping of the bomb; the mushroom cloud was widely shown to illustrate its power. The ticker tape celebrations in America at Japan's surrender were widely shown. The American camera men filmed the aftermath of the bomb in both cities. This footage was filmed in colour; it illustrated the graphic images of devastation. However these images weren't shown in America for over 40 years. The American government didn't want images that showed doubt about the decision to drop the bomb to the American public. The only footage shown in the USA was of the mushroom cloud and all scenes of celebration. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the film, we are shown that church bells, hooters and people shouting were ways to alert people of a nuclear attack. During the nuclear attack this wouldn't be effective. A third film made by America teaches people very simple methods of protection "Duck and cover", this would do nothing to protect them during a real attack. The only reliable film was called "War games", it was created in 1965 by the BBC and was the only film which attempted to give a realistic interpretation of what would happen if a nuclear attack occurred. It predicted panic and confusion, millions of deaths and third degree burns. Government's plans would have been very ineffective against nuclear attacks. "War games" was banned for 40 years and seen as alarmist. The Americans thought that nuclear power was a great new energy source. In the 1950's governments endorsed nuclear energy and portrayed it very positively. This new source of energy can be recharged and 97% of the spent energy can be reused. The government in the 1950's presented nuclear energy as a cheap source of reusable fuel. Housewife's were in awe at how much cleaner nuclear energy was than the fuel they had used previously. Queen Elizabeth opened the first nuclear power station at Sellafield in the 1950's. The issues about the dangers of power stations were omitted in government videos. For my answer, I have analyzed each feature of the film and discussed the issue of reliability that they've raised. ...read more.

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