• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The depression in Britain in the early 1930's

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Describe the affects of The depression in Britain in the early 1930's At the beginning of the 1930's just like America Britain had a major depression which affected almost everyone and everything in the country. But some people were affected worse than others depending on what industry they worked in. In most cases people who worked in the old industries were affected worst because the old industries like Shipbuilding, Textiles, Coal mining and Steel making suffered survirly. Ship building in particular was hit because if no one wanted to buy or sell goods abroad then ships had very little use so few new ones were made and so lots of people lost jobs. This then affected the steel industry because if there wereno ship to build then there was very little use for steel and so less steel was made and even more workers lost their jobs. ...read more.

Middle

Because of the depression people decided to save there money instead of spend it incase they became unemployed they had something to bounce back on. But as a result of this more people lost there jobs because if nobody bought anything then there was no point in making anything. Not all people lost there jobs in the depression, new industry like car making etc were not badly affected so these people in these areas were better off. Middle class people could do things they could never afford before because prices of everything had dropped so that people would spend there money. So some areas were affected worse than others these were areas of old industry that were badly hit which were areas like Jarrow and Cardiff. These areas were all in the coal, steel and ship building areas. There were areas in Britain called special areas which were mainly small isolated villages and towns that few people new about like Merthyr, Tydfil and Mayport. ...read more.

Conclusion

Woman suffered worst of all, they were paid less if they worked and were not counted in for national insurance for unemployment. National insurance only covered the workers and not the woman and children so they did not get free medical help etc. Also when woman went into labour they got no help from doctors, they had to go to a maternity home but had to pay for it so if they didn't have the money then they were on there own. Also another major problem was housing, in parts of London there was three to four families living in a house and stayed all in one room. Large houses were full of families and there were no toilets or sinks and people had to cook on an open fire. Also the people were accompanied by rats and a quarter of a million people were living below the poverty line. So the depression had a tragic affect on a lot of people in Britain and their lively hood. By Sam Lee ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE USA 1919-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE USA 1919-1941 essays

  1. 'The causes and effects of the great depression caused equal suffering to all of ...

    This Source also disagrees with the hypothesis title because it shows not everyone suffered equally during the 1930s. Source 7 Source 7 Is a short extract from a secondary source book discussing Britain's economy in the 1930 using four criteria to judge.

  2. Discuss the reasons for the popularity of gangster films in the early 1930s. Indicate ...

    The gangster films of the 1930s caused great controversy and public anxiety due to the ideologies it promoted and the general content which was seen as a representation of America at the time. Extensive coverage of Gangsters exploits within the media, regularly making the headlines did not serve to dampen public outcry.

  1. To What Extent Did The Depression Have An Impact On Society In Britain During ...

    The people that were affected by the depression the worse had a terrible lifestyle, and could not even afford good food. The majority of people who were living in poverty bought Spam, which wasn't the best of foods, but could be used for many different types of meals.

  2. The Depression of the 1903s lead to severe problems for Britain. Had Britain recovered ...

    People became more aware of home and social life, and lived happily with healthy incomes. People were still starving in the north though. Some workers in a town called Jarrow, near Newcastle, decided to go on a Hunger March, to protest against the conditions.

  1. The 1930's - the great depression

    It seemed a good solution, but eventually they had to pay back instalments on what they had bought. Credit gave people the impression that they could afford more than they really could, but eventually they had to stop buying, as their wages weren't high enough.

  2. 'The Devil's Decade' - How far do you agree with this assessment of the ...

    These houses were also wired up with electricity, causing a growth in the electrical industry and not only did Britain's economy benefit but house owners could enjoy luxuries such as central heating. It is hard to see the 1930s as the ' Devil's Decade' if the period showed no sign

  1. The great depression.

    scandal in which members of the White Sox lost the World Series on purpose. From that point on Gambling was highly frowned upon in baseball. With that memory still fresh in owners' minds, they quickly kicked Fuchs out of the game, and the league itself took control of that franchise (Noverr, Ziewacz 104).

  2. Was There A Depression In Britain In The 1930s?

    Because of this huge chain of unemployment, life became much tougher for the unemployed. Before the last war a quarter of all households were living below the poverty line. They could no longer afford to buy luxuries such as cakes and sweets or many new clothes.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work