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The Fall of Communism in Russia.

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Introduction

The Fall of Communism in Russia Communism: "A scheme of equalizing the social conditions of life; specifically, a scheme which contemplates the abolition of inequalities in the possession of property, as by distributing all wealth equally to all, or by holding all wealth in common for the equal use and advantage of all. " (K. Marx) What Karl Marx had set out in his Communist Manifesto as guide lines for the governing of a state was proved to work to the contrary of its good intentions when applied in Russia. During 1989 the world looked on with amusement as the communist government in the U.S.S.R collapsed and was replaced with a government committed to democracy and the free market. The ethics of brother hood, equality, the plight of the poor and the working class (all characteristics of communism) slowly diminished over the years of corrupt rule, violence and inhumanity; communism would now be popular only as a form of oppression, tyranny and enemy to the world. But one wonders how such a morally profound theory could turn into utter chaos and destruction. Boris Yeltsin described communism as "a pie in the sky", something "man could never truly achieve due to his nature" (L. Nichols). Ultimately, communism in the U.S.S.R was doomed from the onset as it was condemned due to the corruption within is leadership, the lack of support for the economy and the frailties of humanity; making what is perfect on paper ineffective in the real world, hence leading to the fall of one of the strongest nations in the world. ...read more.

Middle

While the political leaders stressed their power to their own contempt, the USSR was essentially crumbling to damnation. As a one-man dictatorship governing the largest country in the world, the economic system at the desolation of the Soviet Union was fundamentally dysfunctional because the state attempted to control far too many aspects of life. From the very beginning Russia's economy was at a set back when Lenin tried to improve diplomatic relations with Germany and gave up Brest-Litovsk to Germany. The impact of this was great economically; Russia lost 75% its iron ore industry, 27 % of its farming land, a fine of 300 million gold roubles and a loss of 35% of its work force (O. Stevens). This great loss impoverished Russia more then it was and set it back economically. Yet conditions did not become any better with the death of Lenin and rise of Stalin, they instead seemed to worsen. During Stalin's period of leadership Russia endured many hardships as "agricultural production output diminished resulting in food shortages, these shortages were enhanced by the mass exportation of food, this was done to pay for industrial imports" (R. Kraft). The production of weapons, and trading food (which the country needed desperately), became second to the need of a growing army. While people died of starvation and food shortages became a critical problem, in 1829 the collectivization of farms began. The one aspect of life, which was not completely out of the people's control, was now to be handed over to the government. ...read more.

Conclusion

This poor leadership made "the country which was one of the largest super power in the world was now poor and desolate while every new political figure was criticized and no longer trust worthy"(L. Nichols). Communism had brought about the most corrupt, hypocritical political figures that would be known throughout history, for their policies contradicting their initial promises and actions offending so many human rights. Russia's economic struggles would also lead it to a state where recovery would not come for years after due to the fact that "the communist way of life was so ingrain in Russian society, the people did not know how to live any other way"(H. Berard 12). This would lend itself to be a problem because new governmental policy would mean reform on the behalf of the people. But what tied all of the flaws of communism in Russia together may most apparently be the frailties of humanity. People were subject to cruel, inhumane treatment and possessed no individual rights as communism progressed to grow in the country, this type of public treatment would be intolerable by the people of Russia and soon cause revolt, this lack of support on the publics behalf weaned communism and would not sustain its survival. Ultimately communism was ideally a theory, which was accepted as relief of the hardships the people of Russia faced from the Monarchy before the revolution. But communism lent its self to have flaws, which easily allowed corruption in Russia when interpreted by leaders who destroyed the economy, inflicted cruelty on humanity and corrupted the political system. Communism may after all, just have been, "a pie in the sky"(L. Nichols). ...read more.

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