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The green revolution is generally used to explain the application of modern, western-type farming techniques to less economically developed countries.

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Introduction

The Green Revolution The green revolution is generally used to explain the application of modern, western-type farming techniques to less economically developed countries. To implement The Green Revolution change needs to occur in three main areas, Biochemical, Mechanical and Social. Each of these three changes need three innovations and each causes three main consequences. To implement Biochemical change there needs to be use of Hybrid seed selection causing increased yields of wheat, rice and maize. Fertilizers are used to increase yield and pesticides are used to control weeds and pests. To change mechanically involves irrigation by diesel pumps to control water supply, tractors and farm mechanization increase arable land and reduce labour force and improved roads and vehicles makes movement to market quicker. ...read more.

Middle

In 1964, farmers in India were short of food, lacked a balanced diet and had an extremely low standard of living. The government had two choices either redistributes the land or improve the technology used by the farmer. They chose the latter and the green revolution began. Eighteen thousand tones of Mexican HYV wheat seeds were imported as well as large amounts of fertilizers. Tractors were imported to replace water buffalo. Communications were improved and there was some land consolidation. Later new rice varieties were developed in the Philippines, most famously the IR-8 variety which is famous for increasing yields six fold in its first harvest. Since then further improvements have decreased the growing season required, allowing for extra rice craps to be grown, and made strains tolerant to a less than optimum climate. ...read more.

Conclusion

These include * HYV seeds need heavy application of fertilizer and pesticides, which have increased costs, encouraged weed growth and polluted water supplies. * Extra irrigation is not always possible * HYV not as drought-resistant nor as suited to waterlogged soils * Farmers unable to afford tractors, seeds and fertilizers have become relatively poorer * Farmers with less than 1 ha of land have usually become poorer * Farmers who have to borrow money to buy seed and fertilizer are likely to get into debt * Still only a few tractors, partly due to cost and shortage of fuel * Mechanization has increased unemployment * Some HYV crops are less palatable to eat In short, social environmental and political failure, the gap between rich and poor and between groups has increased. ...read more.

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