• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

'The impression that the British faced the Blitz with courage and unity is a myth.' Use the sources, and your own knowledge, to explain whether you agree with this statement.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1. Study all the Sources and use your own knowledge. 'The impression that the British faced the Blitz with courage and unity is a myth.' Use the sources, and your own knowledge, to explain whether you agree with this statement. Since the Allies won the war in 1945 and in the 60 intervening years since the Blitz, the British people have honoured their war dead and cherished the memories that sustained them during what was a time of fear, despair and depravation. There are many theories about how we remember and about why we remember things in the way that we do. This includes being selective in our recall. Much of our understanding of the manner in which the British faced the Blitz is coloured by both the positive outcome of the war, and by the way we have chosen, with hindsight, to depict ourselves. ...read more.

Middle

By contrast, Sources A, C and G propagate the now widely held and popular view of the British public's heroism and bravery during the Blitz. Unfortunately, two of these Sources, A and G, are secondary sources that were written some forty plus years after the events they portray. These Sources therefore must be considered biased towards a rosy portrayal of the Blitz as a glorious period in our nation's history. In addition, Source C is clearly a staged photograph filled with apparently happy, though homeless, people smiling at the camera and giving 'thumbs up' signs. Although a primary source since the photograph was taken in September 1940, it must be considered unreliable with respect to its accuracy in interpreting the events of the time. While each of the Sources either support or refute the statement when taken at face value, none of them stand up to sustained examination. ...read more.

Conclusion

As the government's propaganda campaign depicted life in London carrying on as normal with people dining out and clubbing in the West End, it must have been difficult for the people enduring the bombs falling on the East End or in the port and industrial cities of the country to feel as they were part of a courageous and unified resistance against the German onslaught. It can be concluded that the statement is somewhat true in the sense that the mass of the British people, being the middle and lower classes that had little or no other choice, did face the Blitz with courage and unity. However, this was chequered with fear, despair and anger directed at both the government and the ruling classes. Roya Hassanzadeh, 11Bs3, Ashmole School 20th October, 2003 History Coursework: Britain in the Age of Total War 1939 - 1945 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Battle Of Britain - The Popular Myth

    victory as the British always triumph as Hitler can not break the spirit and the will of the British people as the hardest times bring out the best in the British people. Winston Churchill's speeches reassured and boosted the morale of British public during the Second World War.

  2. Haig in sources

    Any Tommy could have told any of the commanders that shell fire just lifts wire up and drops it down often in a worse tangle than before. The generals were incapable of anything more imaginative than repeating the same failed assaults by infantry.

  1. The Impression that the British faced the Blitz with courage and unity is a ...

    the sirens went out, and many people were leaving London, especially the East end, which was one of the worst hit areas, by train. I feel this showed the amount of worrying and panic, which led to people wanting to get away, probably to the countryside.

  2. Study carefully all the sources. 'Without the work of women on the Home Front, ...

    However this source doesn't tell us what factory it is. If the factory is in good condition and the women there are working in an enjoyable atmosphere with good pay then they will be obviously enjoying their work. The source does not tell us the numbers of women that enjoy

  1. "The impression that the British faced the Blitz with courage and unity is a ...

    But while people might deceive themselves the sources separate the facts from fabrication. I think that the statement - "British faced the blitz with courage and unity" is basically a myth but they were some times when people where courageous and united.

  2. Sourcework - The impression that the British faced the Blitz with courage and unity ...

    This was because the German bombers had been instructed to bomb here because of the docks such as Greenwich Pier and East India dock where many goods were incoming and outgoing. The source is also described as being dated in late January 1943 which is towards the end of the Blitz.

  1. 'The impression that the British faced the blitz with courage and unity is a ...

    This tells us information about the blitz and how the British people faced it with courage. This source also tells us that British people were all involved together and that the British did not have to be in 'uniforms to be heroes'.

  2. Dunkirk was a triumph? How far do you agree with this statement?

    It is obvious to me that they did not want to have another ?crack at Jerry.? Additionally, the sheer number of British equipment left behind and number and war prisoners taken at Dunkirk is astounding. A book edited by a senior officer in the British army says,? Hitler announced that 1,212,000 Dutch, Belgian, French and British soldiers.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work