• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The interior of the Apprentice House today bears very little resemblance to what it was like in the early 19th century. Does this mean that it is of no value as evidence of how Styal Apprentices lived in the early 19th century?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The interior of the Apprentice House today bears very little resemblance to what it was like in the early 19th century. Does this mean that it is of no value as evidence of how Styal Apprentices lived in the early 19th century? Since it was last used to house the Apprentices in the mid 19th century, the Apprentice House at Styal has served many purposes. It has served as a television repair shop, a store room and private residence, to name just a few. It has also been derelict. When the National Trust obtained the property in the 1970's it was basically just an empty shell. Even today, half of the House remains the private residence of National trust workers. All of this limits its usefulness and reliability to Historians. As a result, of its many uses, much of the original evidence has been lost. However, regardless of this, the National Trust has an underlying interest, in presenting the Apprentice House as it would have been, when it was in its original use. They have a vested interest in recreating it as accurately as possible, otherwise no customers would visit, and the National trust would lose money. ...read more.

Middle

The Guide said that what is now the Doctor's room was probably 'probably one of the Boy's rooms'. This is, because according to Priestley, the Boy's slept in Dormitories, opposite the girl's: 'the girls on one side of the house and the boys on the other'. According to the Guide, although the room is small, it would only have housed a relatively smaller number of boys. This was, because Mr Greg thought that boys were more troublesome and needed extra room. The room existing today, is based upon what Doctor Holland's, would probably have looked like. For example, according to his Doctor's notebook on October 13th, he says, 'have six leeches applied...apply to a blister'. From this we know that Dr Holland used such remedies as Brimstone and treacle, to promote diarrhoea. The Doctor's room, like many others at the apprentice House, is only a typical Doctor's room. According to the Guide, it was only meant to illustrate the fact that there was a Doctor. The Guide said it is much more likely that Doctor Holland just brought his equipment and set it up in the corner of a room. ...read more.

Conclusion

The modern-day Kitchen is a typical Kitchen of the period, in the probable setting of the original Kitchen and using evidence from the Apprentices who lived there. Because of this, it is a very reliable secondary source for those looking to use it as evidence. As aforementioned, the House's Kitchen garden can, rather accurately, show us what supplemented the apprentice's diet. However, other more miscellaneous things can provide evidence, to how they lived. There is a water pump, outhouse and water bucket, to give us a good idea about what would probably have gone on. With the case of the water pump, we can assume that it was pre-existing to the renovation. Although the Apprentice House today, probably looks little like it would have in terms of layout, to what it would have looked like; the evidence shows that it is fairly matched, in terms of the reliability of evidence. Even though, most of the evidence, particularly the props, is not from the actual apprentice House, the majority of it is of the period. Or at least, it is a modern replica using all of the evidence available. So, the Apprentice House offers quite reliable evidence, as a secondary source, of how the Apprentices would have lived. ?? ?? ?? ?? Adam Pearson-Davies ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Why did Samuel Greg establish a cotton mill at Styal in 1784? ...

    The health of these children was also very good with the death certificate from the Factory Commissioners being 1:150. This was better that the average of Lancashire. Although the children in the apprentice house were well looked after they still had a lot of hard work to do and life was far from easy for them.

  2. Jack The Ripper - Law and Order in the late 19th century

    Examined by Dr Phillips and Dr Blackwell. Four witnesses - Constable said he saw her talking to a dark haired man with a dark deerstalker hat, and Israel Schwartz saw a man pulling and then pushing a woman away from him. Marshall saw her talking to a man at 11.45 with a round cap and appeared to be educated.

  1. Free essay

    Custers responsibilty for teh defeat at Little Bighorn

    In addition to that, his men could have rested up, wait for the other columns and surprised the Indians with a much better chance of defeating the Indians. Events that were out of Custer's control - The fighting ability of the Sioux One of the things that Custer couldn't be blamed for would be the fighting ability of the Sioux.

  2. The Battle of the Little Bighorn.

    This seemed to be his first major mistake. Custer rode south but then disobeyed orders. He didn't circle the Wolf Mountains, but instead, cut across them. By marching through the night and managing to drive his men as hard as possible, he actually reached the Little Bighorn a day early, exactly what he had planned.

  1. Why did medical care need to be improved during the early 19th century

    able to, they did not do it very well in the early 19th Century because they lacked the knowledge and believed in spontaneous generation, which was that things just appeared from nowhere, for example, if you put flour and sugar together in a cellar, then mice and rats would just appear out of nowhere.

  2. How useful is visible evidence in explaining the development of power at Styal Mill ...

    Due to this I do not believe that this beam engine was originally from Styal Mill and has been put in for museum purposes. Near the two steam engines is a large boiler with the date 1880 I believe this was original because it would have matched the horizontal engine at the time.

  1. How did the sixties help improve many peoples lives and how is it looked ...

    people were starting to do it so authority was being forced to change its views. The church also seemed less important to people because there lives suddenly more interesting with all the freedom given to them. People believed this was a good change as it was seen as a for equal opportunity for all of the people in Britain.

  2. "The only good Indian is a dead one". To what extent can this statement ...

    The army defiantly saw the native American as dead. They believed that the Indian way of life had to be destroyed for their country to expand. To get rid of the native Indian, the uncivilised and savage person both physically and mentally was a good thing to do.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work