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The Munich Putsch 1923 - source related study.

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Introduction

Hifzurrahman Patel Page 1 10 CAW/10 C Coursework: The Munich Putsch 1923 1. Source C, Prelude To Terror was written by Richard Hanser in 1971 and seeks to discredit Hitler and show him as a coward we know this because he says that Hitler pretended he was shot dead and then fled from the scene of battle. And he also wrote "at no point did he behave heroically" and "he did not exactly cover himself with glory". Hanser also wrote sarcastically that it is extremely hard or maybe impossible for the average man to lift someone even if he or she was a child. "Not an easy thing to do with only one arm in working order". By saying this Hanser thinks the event about Hitler saving a little boy is a story, he thinks source B by John Toland is a story. Source B is a story made up by the Nazis while source C is more likely to be what had actually happened. Source B on the other hand was published by John Toland in 1976 and is sympathetic towards Hitler, he uses words such as "painfully", "struggled", "slowly" and "agony" to describe how. John's sympathy continues by John describing how Hitler looked whilst he was escaping, he had a "pale face", "cradling his injured arm" and his hair was "falling over his face" , according to John's description of what Hitler looked like when he escaped from the battle. Then John Toland said Hitler wanted to pick up a little boy who was "bleeding profusely", and carry him to safety but schultze (Hitler's driver) ...read more.

Middle

The witness would not be very clear on what happened and probably would have forgotten parts of what happened during the Munich Putsch. He/she has the ability to lie, be biased or he or she might have forgotten what happened over such a long period of time. A witness's memory could be poor or the witness might be confused or might not be sure what happened. A witness may not be willing to give information about the event or might be ashamed that they took part and deny that they took part, they might hide the fact that they were there. The available evidence could be propaganda, it could have been made up or changed to make someone change the way they think, or to cover up a mistake made by a person or group of people. A writer like John Toland might face problems with documents, documents can be propaganda or biased to one side. Incriminating evidence could have been destroyed after or during a war to hide or censor information. Because of the long time between John Toland's written source and the Munich Putsch primary evidence such as photographs and written information could have been worn out and be difficult to see or read. Also to take into consideration by a writer like Toland is that a photograph could be made up/posed for, or changed. A way of telling if a photograph has been posed for is if the people in it are looking directly at the camera or if a large number of them are facing the camera. If people in a photograph look surprised or if a few or none of the people in it are facing the camera, that photograph probably is genuine. ...read more.

Conclusion

Source F was probably taken by a passer by or by a journalist for a newspaper. He or she has to consider when it was taken. In source F's case it was in 1923 on the 9th of November, the same day the Munich Putsch took place, this makes it more reliable. Source F does not attempt to spread a message to its viewers, it is neutral; a historian needs to be able to check whether a photograph is trying to convey a message or if a photograph is just displaying pure facts. A historian needs to know that a painting does not usually intend to tell the truth, it displays what the artist thinks about something. Source G is what its artist thinks about the Beer Hall Putsch. This particular painting is Nazi propaganda, it was painted in 1933, ten years after the Putsch when Hitler came to power. It was probably painted to make Hitler seem like a powerful leader who the German people can trust and to make him and the Nazi party more popular. We know this because in the painting Hitler is standing high above all the other people and he is speaking confidently, we know he is speaking confidently because he is using arm movements to enforce his views and to make the people easily understand what he is saying. All different kinds and classes of German people are shown behind Hitler, listening very carefully as if they want what Hitler is saying to become true. For any paintings and photos to be accepted as evidence they should be checked for reliability against as many sources as possible. ...read more.

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