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The Nazi Police State

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Introduction

´╗┐The Nazi Police State The Police State was central to the whole Nazi project. It was a major part of their machinery to achieve their goals of making the German society racially pure and totally loyal to the Fuhrer. It did this with an aim of controlling every aspect of people's lives. This was achieved through the creation of an environment of fear and terror. This is the way that Hitler put it himself ?Terror is the best political weapon for nothing drives people harder than a fear of sudden death.? The German people learned that they will be safe if they did what they were told. 'Speak through a flower' was simply the best advice at the time. The impact of the Nazi Police State on German people was beyond what had ever been seen. In fact people continued to be willing to denounce relatives, friends or neighbours several years after the Nazi regime had fallen. The Nazi Police State was comprised of four pillars: the SS, the Courts, the Gestapo and the Concentration camps. The SS was formed in 1925 from fanatics loyal to Hitler. ...read more.

Middle

They were subject to hard labour, torture or executions. Despite the brutality of the police state, some Germans could see something good about it. For them, it stopped ?Enemies of the state?. People felt safe from ?enemies?. It got rid of people unaccepted in society e.g. Jews, Communists, homosexuals. People admired the SS? courage and military skills. There was a perception that SS and Gestapo gave Germany order and looked smart. The creation of this terrifying regime was seen as a necessary action to help make Germany strong again. The role of police was extended to become "friend and helper", by watching prices, protecting the youth and curbing unwanted social developments such as abortion. Some people even used the system for their advantage e.g. business people got rid of their competitors by reporting them to the Gestapo. Those few apparent advantages of the police state are nothing to compare to its corrosive on the German society. This huge machine was the brutal instrument by which the Nazi regime controlled the German population. It eroded all aspects of democracy and freedom. ...read more.

Conclusion

This inhumane treatment was often inflicted for the sole purpose of entertaining the guards. Now then was the Police State good or bad for the German people? If you lived under the Nazi Regime, you could be forgiven for feeling that your country safe and strong. People could leave their front door open or leave their clothes hanging to dry without fear of being robbed. People were more than happy to get rid of those portrayed as ?Enemies of the State?. Looking closer at the situation, everyone lived in fear of falling foul with the system. It didn?t take much at all to do something that landed you in a concentration camp. This could simply be the outcome of complaining about your business if you are a shopkeeper, or not responding to a passer-by saying ?Heil Hitler?. Nobody trusted anyone. The German society changed beyond recognition. People became willing informants to the Police State. Even Hitler summed up the purpose of the Police State by saying ?The great strength of the totalitarian state is that it forces those who fear it to imitate it.? This was an evil contradiction. Fear was behind the strength of the totalitarian state, as it was behind the misery of the German people. ...read more.

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