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The object of this coursework is to gather information and data, on how woman worked together, to fight for the rights to vote in parliamentary elections. In addition to this, I will be researching whether the use of violence in certain campaigns

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Introduction

The object of this coursework is to gather information and data, on how woman worked together, to fight for the rights to vote in parliamentary elections. In addition to this, I will be researching whether the use of violence in certain campaigns, was successful in contributing in allowing woman to achieve this goal in 1918. Many women fought for the rights to vote during the middle of the 19th century, where many campaigns both peaceful and violent were set up. I will be researching and comparing these different campaigns to see which was more successful, as well as other events that may have occurred during this period of time, ( where many woman were fighting for the right to vote) to see if these events could have had influenced the law, which came about in 1918. During the end of the 19th century, about two thirds of adult men were given the right to vote in parliamentary elections. Women, prisoners, the poorest men along with those who lived in mental institutions, were not entitled to this vote. Many women fought against this during the middle of the 19th century. When a women of the name Millicent Fawcett founded the National Union of Women's Suffrage societies (NUWSS). During the whole of the nineteenth century, women had no political rights, although there was some movement in other areas to advance the rights of women. In 1839, a law was passed which stated that if a marriage broke down and the parents separated, children under seven years of age should stay with their mother. In 1857, women could divorce husbands who were cruel to them or husbands who had left them. In 1870, women were allowed to keep money they had earned. In 1891, women could not be forced to live with husbands unless they wished to. These were very important laws which advanced the rights of women. ...read more.

Middle

This source does not support the idea that suffragettes got the right to vote by using violence. We have tried every way, but we have had contempt poured upon us. Violence is the only way that we have to get the power that every citizen should have. Emmeline Pankhurst, speaking in 1912. I felt that as Emmeline Pankhurst was the leader of the suffragettes, her reasoning on why they committed violence to get what they wanted was important to my historical enquiry. It seems as many of the suffragettes felt that they weren't being listened to or taken seriously. I feel that violence in a way did get them to be taken seriously by the government and the public. Furthermore it did lead them to have a certain power over these people. This 1906 cartoon shows Suffragettes trying to fight their way into the House of Commons. It portrays woman as being rather wild and untamed. This is one of the many cartoons I found which portrayed woman in a very negative light. I chose this one as it shows clearly how woman were thought to be uncontrolled, without the grace and demeanor that woman were thought they should posses at that time. Haven't the Suffragettes the sense to see that the very worst way of campaigning for the vote is to try and intimidate a man into giving them what he would gladly give otherwise? Lloyd George, speaking in 1913. I think that what Lloyd George said was quite important, as he was one of the politicians who thought that woman should have the right to vote. However what he says about the suffragettes is that he was very against their violent antics. As a politician he would know how to influence the public and fellow members of parliament. Therefore if he thought that the violence that the suffragettes were committing was the worst way in which they could gain the right to vote, it must have meant that many people went against them rather than stand by them. ...read more.

Conclusion

It would have been very difficult and nearly impossible for me to collect this data myself, as this is an historical enquiry. The only way in which I would be able to obtain probably more reliable sources is from museums and historians. I have noticed that many of my sources are from the internet, and I think that if I were to do this enquiry again, I would use a wider range of resources. This would enable me to obtain more views and make my sources more reliable, if they were the same as the sources I found on the internet. I also feel that many of my sources are either news articles or comic scripts; this gave me a good insight into what the public thought about the suffragettes and their violence. However, I think I need more sources such as letters written by politicians and things that were said from them concerning the suffragettes, as they were the ones who would have allowed woman the vote. It would have also given insight into seeing whether they were intimated by the violence of the suffragettes, and so by this fear allowed them the vote. It would also have made my conclusion more reliable. Perhaps I could have expanded my enquiry, by comparing the suffragettes violent campaign with that of the suffragists peaceful campaign, to find out whether sources, historians and the general public thoughts on which was more successful in contributing in getting woman the vote. http://www.johndclare.net/women2.htm Modern World History by Cambridge Modern World History by OCR www.comptonhistory.com/year9/suffragette www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ www.learningcurve.gov.uk/britain1906to1918 www.humanities.uwe.ac.uk/regionhistory/rhcnew/suffrage.htm During the beginning of the 19th century, about two thirds of adult men were given the rights to vote in parliamentary elections. Women, prisoners, the poorest men along with those who lived in mental institutions, were not entitled to this vote because they were believed to be second-class citizens. It was believed by many men that having woman involved in politics would be an unsuitable role for them in society, and that they will not be able to understand the political issues that were involved in parliament. ...read more.

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